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Showing 1 to 15 of 352 results Save | Export
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Delcenserie, A.; Genesee, F.; Trudeau, N.; Champoux, F. – Journal of Child Language, 2019
A battery of standardized language tests and control measures was administered to three groups of at-risk language learners -- internationally adopted children, deaf children with cochlear implants, and children with specific language impairment -- and to groups of second-language learners and typically developing monolingual children. All…
Descriptors: Standardized Tests, Language Tests, At Risk Students, Adoption
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Babatsouli, Elena; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2019
Previous research in child language shows that many aspects of language acquisition are frequency-linked. This study tests whether input or usage frequency predicts the order of acquisition and accuracy of a bilingual Greek-English child's English possessives. The child was followed longitudinally from age 2;6 to 3;11. Order of acquisition was…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Greek, English (Second Language), Second Language Learning
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Lindgren, Josefin – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigates effects of age on character introductions in the oral narratives of seventy-two monolingual Swedish-speaking four- to six-year-olds, comparing results from the Multilingual Assessment Instrument for Narratives (MAIN; Gagarina "et al.," 2012, 2015), and the Edmonton Narrative Norms Instrument (ENNI; Schneider…
Descriptors: Age Differences, Swedish, Oral Language, Monolingualism
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Treiman, Rebecca; Decker, Kristina; Robins, Sarah; Ghosh, Dina; Rosales, Nicole – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Conversations about literacy-related matters with parents can help prepare children for formal literacy instruction. We studied these conversations using data gathered from fifty-six US families as they engaged in daily activities at home. Analyzing conversations when children were aged 1;10, 2;6, 3;6, and 4;2, we found that explicit talk about…
Descriptors: Literacy, Parent Child Relationship, Dialogs (Language), Young Children
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Reese, Elaine; Keegan, Peter; McNaughton, Stuart; Kingi, Te Kani; Carr, Polly Atatoa; Schmidt, Johanna; Mohal, Jatender; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study assessed the status of te reo Maori, the indigenous language of New Zealand, in the context of New Zealand English. From a broadly representative sample of 6327 two-year-olds ("Growing Up in New Zealand"), 6090 mothers (96%) reported their children understood English, and 763 mothers (12%) reported their children understood…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Malayo Polynesian Languages, Pacific Islanders, Indigenous Populations
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Köder, Franziska; Maier, Emar – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children struggle with the interpretation of pronouns in direct speech ("Ann said, 'I get a cookie'"), but not in indirect speech ("Ann said that she gets a cookie") (Köder & Maier, 2016). Yet children's books consistently favor direct over indirect speech (Baker & Freebody, 1989). To reconcile these seemingly…
Descriptors: Story Telling, Personal Narratives, Indo European Languages, Foreign Countries
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Owens, Sarah J.; Thacker, Justine M.; Graham, Susan A. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Speech disfluencies can guide the ways in which listeners interpret spoken language. Here, we examined whether three-year-olds, five-year-olds, and adults use filled pauses to anticipate that a speaker is likely to refer to a novel object. Across three experiments, participants were presented with pairs of novel and familiar objects and heard a…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Young Children, Adults, Age Differences
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Davis, Barbara; van der Feest, Suzanne; Yi, Hoyoung – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigates whether the earliest words children choose to say are mainly words containing sounds they can produce (cf. 'phonological dominance' hypotheses), or whether children choose words without regard to their phonological characteristics (cf. 'lexical dominance' hypotheses). Phonological properties of words in spontaneous speech…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Child Language, Language Usage, Phonology
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Mok, Peggy Pik Ki; Lee, Albert – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous studies on bilingual children found intact tonal development at the initial stages of interaction between Cantonese and English in successive bilingual children, whereas children exposed to both languages from birth have not been studied in this regard. We examined the production of Cantonese tones by five simultaneous bilingual children…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Tone Languages, Sino Tibetan Languages, English
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Szendroi, Kriszta; Bernard, Carline; Berger, Frauke; Gervain, Judit; Hohle, Barbara – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous research on young children's knowledge of prosodic focus marking has revealed an apparent paradox, with comprehension appearing to lag behind production. Comprehension of prosodic focus is difficult to study experimentally due to its subtle and ambiguous contribution to pragmatic meaning. We designed a novel comprehension task, which…
Descriptors: Child Language, Young Children, Suprasegmentals, French
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Haendler, Yair; Adani, Flavia – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous studies have found that Hebrew-speaking children accurately comprehend object relatives (OR) with an embedded non-referential arbitrary subject pronoun (ASP). The facilitation of ORs with embedded pronouns is expected both from a discourse-pragmatics perspective and within a syntax-based locality approach. However, the specific effect of…
Descriptors: Semitic Languages, Child Language, Form Classes (Languages), Comprehension
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Hwang, Hyesung G.; Markson, Lori – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children categorize native-accented speakers as local and non-native-accented speakers as foreign, suggesting they use accent (i.e., phonological proficiency) to determine social group membership. However, it is unclear if accent is the strongest--AND ONLY--group marker children use to determine social group membership, or whether other aspects of…
Descriptors: Syntax, Semantics, Phonology, English
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Yang, Jing – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study compared the temporal measurements of stop consonants in 29 three- to six-year-old Mandarin-speaking children and 12 Mandarin-speaking adults. Each participant produced 18 Mandarin disyllabic words which contained six stop consonants /p, p?, t, t?, k, k?/ each followed by three vowels /a, i, u/ at the word-initial position in the first…
Descriptors: Phonemes, Mandarin Chinese, Language Acquisition, Child Language
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Tomoko Tatsumi; Ambridge, Ben; Pine, Julian M. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study tested the claim of input-based accounts of language acquisition that children's inflectional errors reflect competition between different forms of the same verb in memory. In order to distinguish this claim from the claim that inflectional errors reflect the use of a morphosyntactic default, we focused on the Japanese verb system,…
Descriptors: Child Language, Language Acquisition, Error Patterns, Morphology (Languages)
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McGregor, Karla; Munro, Natalie; Chen, Su Mei; Baker, Elise; Oleson, Jacob – Journal of Child Language, 2018
To determine whether the developing semantic lexicon varies with culture, we examined the animal and food naming of children from three communities distinguished by language, cultural heritage, and population density. The children were fve- and seven-year-olds from Australia (n = 197), Taiwan (n = 456), and the US (n = 172). Naming patterns…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Cultural Influences, Semantics, Dictionaries
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