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Van De Velde, Daan J.; Schiller, Niels O.; Levelt, Claartje C.; Van Heuven, Vincent J.; Beers, Mieke; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Frijns, Johan H. M. – Journal of Child Language, 2019
The perception and production of emotional and linguistic (focus) prosody were compared in children with cochlear implants (CI) and normally hearing (NH) peers. Thirteen CI and thirteen hearing-age-matched school-aged NH children were tested, as baseline, on non-verbal emotion understanding, non-word repetition, and stimulus identification and…
Descriptors: Intonation, Indo European Languages, Assistive Technology, Correlation
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Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F.; McAlpine, Rachel P.; Abdi, Herve – Journal of Child Language, 2018
To communicate, children must discriminate and identify speech sounds. Because visual speech plays an important role in this process, we explored how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification by children. Critical items had intact visual speech (e.g. baez) coupled to non-intact (excised onsets) auditory speech (signified…
Descriptors: Auditory Discrimination, Syllables, Identification, Speech Communication
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Erdener, Dogu; Burnham, Denis – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Despite the body of research on auditory-visual speech perception in infants and schoolchildren, development in the early childhood period remains relatively uncharted. In this study, English-speaking children between three and four years of age were investigated for: (i) the development of visual speech perception--lip-reading and visual…
Descriptors: Auditory Perception, Visual Perception, Vocabulary Development, Receptive Language
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Lany, Jill; Shoaib, Amber; Thompson, Abbie; Estes, Katharine Graf – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Infants are adept at learning statistical regularities in artificial language materials, suggesting that the ability to learn statistical structure may support language development. Indeed, infants who perform better on statistical learning tasks tend to be more advanced in parental reports of infants' language skills. Work with adults suggests…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Processing, Syllables, Language Acquisition
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Köder, Franziska; Maier, Emar – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children struggle with the interpretation of pronouns in direct speech ("Ann said, 'I get a cookie'"), but not in indirect speech ("Ann said that she gets a cookie") (Köder & Maier, 2016). Yet children's books consistently favor direct over indirect speech (Baker & Freebody, 1989). To reconcile these seemingly…
Descriptors: Story Telling, Personal Narratives, Indo European Languages, Foreign Countries
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Owens, Sarah J.; Thacker, Justine M.; Graham, Susan A. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Speech disfluencies can guide the ways in which listeners interpret spoken language. Here, we examined whether three-year-olds, five-year-olds, and adults use filled pauses to anticipate that a speaker is likely to refer to a novel object. Across three experiments, participants were presented with pairs of novel and familiar objects and heard a…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Young Children, Adults, Age Differences
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Gros-Louis, Julie; Miller, Jennifer L. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Social feedback is a driving force for speech development. A recent study provided a key finding to explain how contingent responses influence developmental change: infant speech-related vocalizations are contingent on responses to prior speech-related vocalizations (Warlaumont "et al.," 2014). However, the study did not distinguish…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Speech Communication, Developmental Stages, Infants
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Sundara, Megha – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children pay more attention to the beginnings and ends of sentences rather than the middle. In natural speech, ends of sentences are prosodically and segmentally enhanced; they are also privileged by sensory and recall advantages. We contrasted whether acoustic enhancement or sensory and recall-related advantages are necessary and sufficient for…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Grammar, Morphemes, Sentences
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Davis, Barbara; van der Feest, Suzanne; Yi, Hoyoung – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigates whether the earliest words children choose to say are mainly words containing sounds they can produce (cf. 'phonological dominance' hypotheses), or whether children choose words without regard to their phonological characteristics (cf. 'lexical dominance' hypotheses). Phonological properties of words in spontaneous speech…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Child Language, Language Usage, Phonology
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Colletta, Jean-Marc; Pellenq, Catherine; Hadian-Cefidekhanie, Ali; Rousset, Isabelle – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This paper reports on an original study designed to investigate age-related change in the way French children produce speech during oral narrative, considering both prosodic parameters -- speaking rate and duration of the prosodic speech unit -- and linguistic structure. Eighty-five French children aged four to eleven years were asked to tell a…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Children, Articulation (Speech), Phonics
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Che, Elizabeth S.; Brooks, Patricia J.; Alarcon, Maria F.; Yannaco, Francis D.; Donnelly, Seamus – Journal of Child Language, 2018
When engaged in conversation, both parents and children tend to re-use words that their partner has just said. This study explored whether proportions of maternal and/or child utterances that overlapped in content with what their partner had just said contributed to growth in mean length of utterance (MLU), developmental sentence score, and…
Descriptors: Child Language, Language Acquisition, Computational Linguistics, Databases
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Chin, Iris; Goodwin, Matthew S.; Vosoughi, Soroush; Roy, Deb; Naigles, Letitia R. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Studies investigating the development of tense/aspect in children with developmental disorders have focused on production frequency and/or relied on short spontaneous speech samples. How children with developmental disorders use future forms/constructions is also unknown. The current study expands this literature by examining frequency,…
Descriptors: Child Development, Morphemes, Language Acquisition, Language Usage
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Archer, Stephanie L.; Curtin, Suzanne – Journal of Child Language, 2018
During the first two years of life, infants concurrently refine native-language speech categories and word learning skills. However, in the Switch Task, 14-month-olds do not detect minimal contrasts in a novel object--word pairing (Stager & Werker, 1997). We investigate whether presenting infants with acoustically salient contrasts (liquids)…
Descriptors: Infants, Child Language, Language Acquisition, Acoustics
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Kalashnikova, Marina; Burnham, Denis – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This longitudinal study assessed three acoustic components of maternal infant-directed speech (IDS) -- pitch, affect, and vowel hyperarticulation -- in relation to infants' age and their expressive vocabulary size. These three individual components were measured in IDS addressed to infants at 7, 9, 11, 15, and 19 months (N = 18). All three…
Descriptors: Infants, Acoustics, Phonology, Language Acquisition
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Drijbooms, Elise; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo – Journal of Child Language, 2017
This study investigated the development of evaluation in narratives from middle to late childhood, within the context of differentiating between spoken and written modalities. Two parallel forms of a picture story were used to elicit spoken and written narratives from fourth- and sixth-graders. It was expected that, in addition to an increase of…
Descriptors: Children, Speech Communication, Written Language, Grade 4
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