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Showing 1 to 15 of 186 results Save | Export
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Brouwer, Susanne; Özkan, Deniz; Küntay, Aylin C. – Journal of Child Language, 2019
This study investigated whether cross-linguistic differences affect semantic prediction. We assessed this by looking at two languages, Dutch and Turkish, that differ in word order and thus vary in how words come together to create sentence meaning. In an eye-tracking task, Dutch and Turkish four-year-olds (N = 40), five-year-olds (N = 58), and…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Verbs, Contrastive Linguistics, Semantics
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Deng, Xiangjun; Yip, Virginia – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigates Mandarin-speaking children's knowledge of event semantics in interpreting spatial modifiers with "zai" 'at' after a posture verb or before a placement verb. The event-semantic principles investigated include subevent modification (Parsons, 1990) and aspect shift (Fong, 1997). We conducted an experimental study…
Descriptors: Semantics, Mandarin Chinese, Verbs, Phrase Structure
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Mitrofanova, Natalia; Westergaard, Marit – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This paper focuses on the acquisition of locative prepositional phrases in L1 Norwegian. We report on two production experiments with children acquiring Norwegian as their first language and compare the results to similar experiments conducted with Russian children. The results of the experiments show that Norwegian children at age 2 regularly…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Norwegian, Grammar, Form Classes (Languages)
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Hwang, Hyesung G.; Markson, Lori – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children categorize native-accented speakers as local and non-native-accented speakers as foreign, suggesting they use accent (i.e., phonological proficiency) to determine social group membership. However, it is unclear if accent is the strongest--AND ONLY--group marker children use to determine social group membership, or whether other aspects of…
Descriptors: Syntax, Semantics, Phonology, English
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Schwab, Jessica F.; Lew-Williams, Casey; Goldberg, Adele E. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children tend to regularize their productions when exposed to artificial languages, an advantageous response to unpredictable variation. But generalizations in natural languages are typically conditioned by factors that children ultimately learn. In two experiments, adult and six-year-old learners witnessed two novel classifiers, probabilistically…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Linguistic Input, Language Processing, Semantics
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McGregor, Karla; Munro, Natalie; Chen, Su Mei; Baker, Elise; Oleson, Jacob – Journal of Child Language, 2018
To determine whether the developing semantic lexicon varies with culture, we examined the animal and food naming of children from three communities distinguished by language, cultural heritage, and population density. The children were fve- and seven-year-olds from Australia (n = 197), Taiwan (n = 456), and the US (n = 172). Naming patterns…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Cultural Influences, Semantics, Dictionaries
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Kurumada, Chigusa; Clark, Eve V. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Can preschoolers make pragmatic inferences based on the intonation of an utterance? Previous work has found that young children appear to ignore intonational meanings and come to understand contrastive intonation contours only after age six. We show that four-year-olds succeed in interpreting an English utterance, such as "It LOOKS like a…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Pragmatics, Inferences, Intonation
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Barner, David – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Perceptual representations of objects and approximate magnitudes are often invoked as building blocks that children combine to acquire the positive integers. Systems of numerical perception are either assumed to contain the logical foundations of arithmetic innately, or to supply the basis for their induction. I propose an alternative to this…
Descriptors: Numbers, Perception, Children, Learning
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Chen, Jidong – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Children have to figure out the lexicalization of meaning components in learning verb semantics (e.g. Behrens, 1998; Gentner, 1982; Tomasello & Brooks, 1998). The meaning of an English state-change verb (e.g. "break") is divided into two portions (i.e. cause and result), respectively encoded with a separate verb in a Mandarin…
Descriptors: Mandarin Chinese, Verbs, Semantics, Children
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Mak, Willem M.; Tribushinina, Elena; Lomako, Julia; Gagarina, Natalia; Abrosova, Ekaterina; Sanders, Ted – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Production studies show that both Russian-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI) and bilingual children for whom Russian is a non-dominant language have difficulty distinguishing between the near-synonymous connectives "i" "and" and "a" "and/but." "I" is a preferred connective…
Descriptors: Bilingual Students, Monolingualism, Language Impairments, Comparative Analysis
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Longobardi, Emiddia; Spataro, Pietro; Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Many studies have addressed the question of the relative dominance of nouns over verbs in the productive vocabularies of children in the second year of life. Surprisingly, cross-class (noun-to-verb and verb-to-noun) relations between these two lexical categories have seldom been investigated. The present longitudinal study employed observational…
Descriptors: Nouns, Verbs, Prediction, Regression (Statistics)
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Knoepke, Julia; Richter, Tobias; Isberner, Maj-Britt; Naumann, Johannes; Neeb, Yvonne; Weinert, Sabine – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Establishing local coherence relations is central to text comprehension. Positive-causal coherence relations link a cause and its consequence, whereas negative-causal coherence relations add a contrastive meaning (negation) to the causal link. According to the cumulative cognitive complexity approach, negative-causal coherence relations are…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Accuracy, German, Elementary School Students
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Li, Hong; Dronjic, Vedran; Chen, Xi; Li, Yixun; Cheng, Yahua; Wu, Xinchun – Journal of Child Language, 2017
This study investigates the contributions of semantic, phonological, and orthographic factors to morphological awareness of 413 Chinese-speaking students in Grades 2, 4, and 6, and its relationship with reading comprehension. Participants were orally presented with pairs of bimorphemic compounds and asked to judge whether the first morphemes of…
Descriptors: Morphology (Languages), Semantics, Phonology, Orthographic Symbols
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2016
The environmental context of verbs addressed by adults to young children is claimed to be uninformative regarding the verbs' meaning, yielding the Syntactic Bootstrapping Hypothesis that, for verb learning, full sentences are needed to demonstrate the semantic arguments of verbs. However, reanalysis of Gleitman's (1990) original data regarding…
Descriptors: Verbs, Language Acquisition, Pragmatics, Vocabulary Development
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Bedore, Lisa M.; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Griffin, Zenzi M.; Hixon, J. Gregory – Journal of Child Language, 2016
This study evaluates the effects of Age of Exposure to English (AoEE) and Current Input/Output on language performance in a cross-sectional sample of Spanish-English bilingual children. First- (N = 586) and third-graders (N = 298) who spanned a wide range of bilingual language experience participated. Parents and teachers provided information…
Descriptors: Elementary School Students, Grade 1, Grade 3, Language Acquisition
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