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Showing 1 to 15 of 187 results Save | Export
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Tang, Ping; Yuen, Ivan; Xu Rattanasone, Nan; Gao, Liqun; Demuth, Katherine – Journal of Child Language, 2019
Weak syllables in Germanic and Romance languages have been reported to be challenging for young children, with syllable omission and/or incomplete reduction persisting till age five. In Mandarin Chinese, neutral tone (T0) involves a weak syllable with varied pitch realizations across (preceding) tonal contexts and short duration. The present study…
Descriptors: Syllables, Mandarin Chinese, Tone Languages, Intonation
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Brouwer, Susanne; Özkan, Deniz; Küntay, Aylin C. – Journal of Child Language, 2019
This study investigated whether cross-linguistic differences affect semantic prediction. We assessed this by looking at two languages, Dutch and Turkish, that differ in word order and thus vary in how words come together to create sentence meaning. In an eye-tracking task, Dutch and Turkish four-year-olds (N = 40), five-year-olds (N = 58), and…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Verbs, Contrastive Linguistics, Semantics
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Han, Min Kyung; Storkel, Holly; Bontempo, Daniel E. – Journal of Child Language, 2019
Many studies have addressed the effect of neighborhood density (phonological similarity among words) on word learning in quiet listening conditions. We explored how noise influences the effect of neighborhood density on children's word learning. One-hundred-and-two preschoolers learned nonwords varied in neighborhood density in one of four…
Descriptors: Acoustics, Language Acquisition, Vocabulary Development, Phonology
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Jerger, Susan; Damian, Markus F.; McAlpine, Rachel P.; Abdi, Herve – Journal of Child Language, 2018
To communicate, children must discriminate and identify speech sounds. Because visual speech plays an important role in this process, we explored how visual speech influences phoneme discrimination and identification by children. Critical items had intact visual speech (e.g. baez) coupled to non-intact (excised onsets) auditory speech (signified…
Descriptors: Auditory Discrimination, Syllables, Identification, Speech Communication
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Erdener, Dogu; Burnham, Denis – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Despite the body of research on auditory-visual speech perception in infants and schoolchildren, development in the early childhood period remains relatively uncharted. In this study, English-speaking children between three and four years of age were investigated for: (i) the development of visual speech perception--lip-reading and visual…
Descriptors: Auditory Perception, Visual Perception, Vocabulary Development, Receptive Language
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Lohndorf, Regina T.; Vermeer, Harriet J.; Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Mesman, Judi – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Preschoolers' vocabulary acquisition sets the stage for later reading ability and school achievement. This study examined the role of socioeconomic status (SES) and the quality of the home environment of seventy-seven Chilean majority and Mapuche minority families from low and lower-middle-class backgrounds in explaining individual differences in…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Preschool Children, Vocabulary Development, Socioeconomic Status
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Carmiol, Ana M.; Matthews, Danielle; Rodríguez-Villagra, Odir A. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Asking children to clarify themselves promotes their ability to uniquely identify objects in referential communication tasks. However, little is known about whether parents ask preschoolers for clarification during interactions and, if so, how. Study 1 explored how mothers clarify their preschoolers' ambiguous descriptions of the characters in…
Descriptors: Language Usage, Preschool Children, Child Language, Mothers
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Tieu, Lyn; Romoli, Jacopo; Poortman, Eva; Winter, Yoad; Crain, Stephen – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous developmental studies of conjunction have focused on the syntax of phrasal and sentential coordination (Lust, 1977; de Villiers, Tager-Flusberg & Hakuta, 1977; Bloom, Lahey, Hood, Lifter & Fiess, 1980, among others). The present study examined the flexibility of children's interpretation of conjunction. Specifically, when two…
Descriptors: Child Language, Form Classes (Languages), Preschool Children, Syntax
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Bonifacci, Paola; Barbieri, Margherita; Tomassini, Marta; Roch, Maja – Journal of Child Language, 2018
The aim of this study was to compare linguistic and narrative skills of monolingual and bilingual preschoolers and to estimate linguistic predictors of the macro-structural level of narratives. A battery of linguistic measures in Italian was administered to sixty-four Monolinguals and sixty-four Early Bilinguals; it included Vocabulary,…
Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Language Skills, Monolingualism, Bilingualism
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Chan, Angel; Yang, Wenchun; Chang, Franklin; Kidd, Evan – Journal of Child Language, 2018
We report on an eye-tracking study that investigated four-year-old Cantonese-speaking children's online processing of subject and object relative clauses (RCs). Children's eye-movements were recorded as they listened to RC structures identifying a unique referent (e.g. "Can you pick up the horse that pushed the pig?"). Two RC types,…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Sino Tibetan Languages, Reading Processes, Language Processing
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Goodrich, J. Marc; Lonigan, Christopher J. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study evaluated the development of vocabulary knowledge over the course of two academic years, beginning in preschool, in a large sample (N = 944) of language-minority children using scores from single-language vocabulary assessments and conceptual scores. Results indicated that although children began the study with higher raw scores for…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Native Language, Second Language Learning, Vocabulary Development
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Deng, Xiangjun; Yip, Virginia – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigates Mandarin-speaking children's knowledge of event semantics in interpreting spatial modifiers with "zai" 'at' after a posture verb or before a placement verb. The event-semantic principles investigated include subevent modification (Parsons, 1990) and aspect shift (Fong, 1997). We conducted an experimental study…
Descriptors: Semantics, Mandarin Chinese, Verbs, Phrase Structure
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Kurumada, Chigusa; Clark, Eve V. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Can preschoolers make pragmatic inferences based on the intonation of an utterance? Previous work has found that young children appear to ignore intonational meanings and come to understand contrastive intonation contours only after age six. We show that four-year-olds succeed in interpreting an English utterance, such as "It LOOKS like a…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Pragmatics, Inferences, Intonation
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Papafragou, Anna; Fairchild, Sarah; Cohen, Matthew L.; Friedberg, Carlyn – Journal of Child Language, 2017
During communication, hearers try to infer the speaker's intentions to be able to understand what the speaker means. Nevertheless, whether (and how early) preschoolers track their interlocutors' mental states is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, there is disagreement about how children's ability to consult a speaker's belief in communicative…
Descriptors: Interpersonal Communication, Inferences, Intention, Preschool Children
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Singh, Leher; Tan, Aloysia; Wewalaarachchi, Thilanga D. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Children undergo gradual progression in their ability to differentiate correct and incorrect pronunciations of words, a process that is crucial to establishing a native vocabulary. For the most part, the development of mature phonological representations has been researched by investigating children's sensitivity to consonant and vowel variation,…
Descriptors: Child Language, Chinese, Preschool Children, Pronunciation
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