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Contemori, Carla; Carlson, Matthew; Marinis, Theodoros – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous research has shown that children demonstrate similar sentence processing reflexes to those observed in adults, but they have difficulties revising an erroneous initial interpretation when they process garden-path sentences, passives, and "wh"-questions. We used the visual-world paradigm to examine children's use of syntactic and…
Descriptors: Oral Language, Syntax, Ambiguity (Semantics), Eye Movements
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Yang, Jing – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study investigated the durational features of English word-initial /s/+stop clusters produced by bilingual Mandarin (L1)-English (L2) children and monolingual English children and adults. The participants included two groups of five- to six-year-old bilingual children: low proficiency in the L2 (Bi-low) and high proficiency in the L2…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Mandarin Chinese, English (Second Language), Second Language Learning
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Lany, Jill; Shoaib, Amber; Thompson, Abbie; Estes, Katharine Graf – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Infants are adept at learning statistical regularities in artificial language materials, suggesting that the ability to learn statistical structure may support language development. Indeed, infants who perform better on statistical learning tasks tend to be more advanced in parental reports of infants' language skills. Work with adults suggests…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Processing, Syllables, Language Acquisition
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Reese, Elaine; Keegan, Peter; McNaughton, Stuart; Kingi, Te Kani; Carr, Polly Atatoa; Schmidt, Johanna; Mohal, Jatender; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This study assessed the status of te reo Maori, the indigenous language of New Zealand, in the context of New Zealand English. From a broadly representative sample of 6327 two-year-olds ("Growing Up in New Zealand"), 6090 mothers (96%) reported their children understood English, and 763 mothers (12%) reported their children understood…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Malayo Polynesian Languages, Pacific Islanders, Indigenous Populations
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Menke, Mandy R. – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Rhotics, particularly the trill, are late acquired sounds in Spanish. Reports of Spanish-English bilingual preschoolers document age-appropriate articulations, but studies do not explore productions once exposure to English increases. This paper reports on the rhotic productions of a cross-sectional sample of 31 Spanish-English bilingual children,…
Descriptors: Child Language, Bilingualism, Children, Spanish Speaking
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Hervé, Coralie; Serratrice, Ludovica – Journal of Child Language, 2018
This paper reports the preliminary results of a study examining the role of structural overlap, language exposure, and language use on cross-linguistic influence (CLI) in bilingual first language acquisition. We focus on the longitudinal development of determiners in a corpus of two French-English children between the ages of 2;4 and 3;7. The…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Native Language, English, Language Acquisition
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Mok, Peggy Pik Ki; Lee, Albert – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous studies on bilingual children found intact tonal development at the initial stages of interaction between Cantonese and English in successive bilingual children, whereas children exposed to both languages from birth have not been studied in this regard. We examined the production of Cantonese tones by five simultaneous bilingual children…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Tone Languages, Sino Tibetan Languages, English
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Tal, Shira; Arnon, Inbal – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Socio-economic status (SES) impacts the amount and type of input children hear in ways that have developmental consequences. Here, we examine the effect of SES on the use of variation sets (successive utterances with partial self-repetitions) in child-directed speech (CDS). Variation sets have been found to facilitate language learning, but have…
Descriptors: Socioeconomic Status, Child Language, Caregivers, Semitic Languages
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Hickmann, Maya; Hendriks, Henriëtte; Harr, Anne-Katharina; Bonnet, Philippe – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous research on motion expression indicates that typological properties influence how speakers select and express information in discourse (Slobin, 2004; Talmy, 2000). The present study further addresses this question by examining the expression of caused motion by adults and children (three to ten years) in French ("Verb-framed")…
Descriptors: Child Language, Contrastive Linguistics, English, German
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Szendroi, Kriszta; Bernard, Carline; Berger, Frauke; Gervain, Judit; Hohle, Barbara – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Previous research on young children's knowledge of prosodic focus marking has revealed an apparent paradox, with comprehension appearing to lag behind production. Comprehension of prosodic focus is difficult to study experimentally due to its subtle and ambiguous contribution to pragmatic meaning. We designed a novel comprehension task, which…
Descriptors: Child Language, Young Children, Suprasegmentals, French
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Hwang, Hyesung G.; Markson, Lori – Journal of Child Language, 2018
Children categorize native-accented speakers as local and non-native-accented speakers as foreign, suggesting they use accent (i.e., phonological proficiency) to determine social group membership. However, it is unclear if accent is the strongest--AND ONLY--group marker children use to determine social group membership, or whether other aspects of…
Descriptors: Syntax, Semantics, Phonology, English
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Barbosa, Poliana; Nicoladis, Elena; Keith, Margaux – Journal of Child Language, 2017
We investigated how bilinguals choose words in a narrative task, contrasting the possibilities of a developmental delay vs. compensatory strategies. To characterize a developmental delay, we compared younger (three to five years) and older (seven to ten years) children's lexicalization of target words (Study 1). The younger children told shorter…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Bilingual Students, Children, Lexicology
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Kurumada, Chigusa; Clark, Eve V. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Can preschoolers make pragmatic inferences based on the intonation of an utterance? Previous work has found that young children appear to ignore intonational meanings and come to understand contrastive intonation contours only after age six. We show that four-year-olds succeed in interpreting an English utterance, such as "It LOOKS like a…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Pragmatics, Inferences, Intonation
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Legacy, Jacqueline; Reider, Jessica; Crivello, Cristina; Kuzyk, Olivia; Friend, Margaret; Zesiger, Pascal; Poulin-Dubois, Diane – Journal of Child Language, 2017
In order to address gaps in the literature surrounding the acquisition of translation equivalents (TEs) in young bilinguals, two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, TEs were measured in the expressive vocabularies of thirty-four French-English bilinguals at 1;4, 1;10, and 2;6 using the MacArthur Bates CDI. Children's acquisition of TEs…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Young Children, French, English
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Geffen, Susan; Mintz, Toben H. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
In many languages, declaratives and interrogatives differ in word order properties, and in syntactic organization more broadly. Thus, in order to learn the distinct syntactic properties of the two sentence types, learners must first be able to distinguish them using non-syntactic information. Prosodic information is often assumed to be a useful…
Descriptors: Infants, Suprasegmentals, Mothers, Speech Communication
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