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Geffen, Susan; Mintz, Toben H. – Journal of Child Language, 2017
In many languages, declaratives and interrogatives differ in word order properties, and in syntactic organization more broadly. Thus, in order to learn the distinct syntactic properties of the two sentence types, learners must first be able to distinguish them using non-syntactic information. Prosodic information is often assumed to be a useful…
Descriptors: Infants, Suprasegmentals, Mothers, Speech Communication
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Ferguson, Brock; Waxman, Sandra – Journal of Child Language, 2017
Language exerts a powerful influence on our concepts. We review evidence documenting the developmental origins of a precocious link between language and object categories in very young infants. This collection of studies documents a cascading process in which early links between language and cognition provide the foundation for later, more precise…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Concept Formation, Classification, Infants
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Ambridge, Ben; Kidd, Evan; Rowland, Caroline F.; Theakston, Anna L. – Journal of Child Language, 2015
This review article presents evidence for the claim that frequency effects are pervasive in children's first language acquisition, and hence constitute a phenomenon that any successful account must explain. The article is organized around four key domains of research: children's acquisition of single words, inflectional morphology, simple…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Child Language, Morphology (Languages), Syntax
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Foltz, Anouschka; Thiele, Kristina; Kahsnitz, Dunja; Stenneken, Prisca – Journal of Child Language, 2015
This study examines whether lexical repetition, syntactic skills, and working memory (WM) affect children's syntactic-priming behavior, i.e. their tendency to adopt previously encountered syntactic structures. Children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and typically developing (TD) children were primed with prenominal (e.g. "the yellow…
Descriptors: Child Language, Syntax, Priming, Lexicology
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Kol, Sheli; Nir, Bracha; Wintner, Shuly – Journal of Child Language, 2014
Several models of language acquisition have emerged in recent years that rely on computational algorithms for simulation and evaluation. Computational models are formal and precise, and can thus provide mathematically well-motivated insights into the process of language acquisition. Such models are amenable to robust computational evaluation,…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Models, Computational Linguistics, Evaluation Methods
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Pye, Clifton; Pfeiler, Barbara – Journal of Child Language, 2014
This article demonstrates how the Comparative Method can be applied to cross-linguistic research on language acquisition. The Comparative Method provides a systematic procedure for organizing and interpreting acquisition data from different languages. The Comparative Method controls for cross-linguistic differences at all levels of the grammar and…
Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Language Acquisition, Language Research, Research Methodology
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Stoel-Gammon, Carol – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Our understanding of the relationships between lexical and phonological development has been enhanced in recent years by increased interest in this area from language scientists, psychologists and phonologists. This review article provides a summary of research, highlighting similarities and differences across studies. It is suggested that the…
Descriptors: Phonology, Psychologists, Vocabulary Development, Language Acquisition
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van Heugten, Marieke; Johnson, Elizabeth K. – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Dutch, unlike English, contains two gender-marked forms of the definite article. Does the presence of multiple definite article forms lead Dutch learners to be delayed relative to English learners in the acquisition of their determiner system? Using the Preferential Looking Procedure, we found that Dutch-learning children aged 1 ; 7 to 2 ; 0 use…
Descriptors: Sentences, Cues, Nouns, Indo European Languages
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Dromi, Esther; Zaidman-Zait, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2011
The Hebrew Parent Questionnaire for Communication and Early Language (HPQ-CEL) was administered by 154 parents of Hebrew-speaking toddlers aged 1 ; 0 to 1 ; 3 (77 boys, 77 girls). The Questionnaire guided parents in observing and rating their toddlers in six contexts at home. The study aimed to identify inter-correlations between toddlers'…
Descriptors: Semitic Languages, Toddlers, Cooperation, Questionnaires
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Adani, Flavia – Journal of Child Language, 2011
In a number of studies, the acquisition of restrictive relative clauses (RCs) shows contrasting findings regarding comprehension and production, with the former usually delayed up to the age of five. As previously claimed in the literature, we suggest that this delay is a task artifact and we present a new procedure for the assessment of…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Child Language, Italian, Grammar
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Herr-Israel, Ellen; McCune, Lorraine – Journal of Child Language, 2011
In the period between sole use of single words and majority use of multiword utterances, children draw from their existing productive capability and conversational input to facilitate the eventual outcome of majority use of multiword utterances. During this period, children use word combinations that are not yet mature multiword utterances, termed…
Descriptors: Child Language, Children, Mothers, Language Acquisition
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Scofield, Jason; Miller, Andrea; Hartin, Travis – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Two studies examined whether preschool children preferred to select a moving object over stationary objects when determining the referent of a novel word. In both studies three- and four-year-olds observed three novel objects, one moving object and two stationary objects. In Study 1, children (n=44) were asked to select the object that best…
Descriptors: Cues, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Preschool Children, Child Language
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Zammit, Maria; Schafer, Graham – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Ten mothers were observed prospectively, interacting with their infants aged 0 ; 10 in two contexts (picture description and noun description). Maternal communicative behaviours were coded for volubility, gestural production and labelling style. Verbal labelling events were categorized into three exclusive categories: label only; label plus…
Descriptors: Nouns, Parent Child Relationship, Mothers, Infants
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Kidd, Evan; Stewart, Andrew J.; Serratrice, Ludovica – Journal of Child Language, 2011
In this paper we report on a visual world eye-tracking experiment that investigated the differing abilities of adults and children to use referential scene information during reanalysis to overcome lexical biases during sentence processing. The results showed that adults incorporated aspects of the referential scene into their parse as soon as it…
Descriptors: Sentences, Cues, Language Processing, Eye Movements
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Pelham, Sabra D. – Journal of Child Language, 2011
English-acquiring children frequently make pronoun case errors, while German-acquiring children rarely do. Nonetheless, German-acquiring children frequently make article case errors. It is proposed that when child-directed speech contains a high percentage of case-ambiguous forms, case errors are common in child language; when percentages are low,…
Descriptors: Form Classes (Languages), Linguistic Input, Figurative Language, Child Language
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