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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2016
The environmental context of verbs addressed by adults to young children is claimed to be uninformative regarding the verbs' meaning, yielding the Syntactic Bootstrapping Hypothesis that, for verb learning, full sentences are needed to demonstrate the semantic arguments of verbs. However, reanalysis of Gleitman's (1990) original data regarding…
Descriptors: Verbs, Language Acquisition, Pragmatics, Vocabulary Development
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2016
Before they are 3;0-3;6, children typically do not engage with peers in focused interaction, although they do with adults. With parents, children interact around the "here-and-now". We hypothesize that young peers do not attempt to establish joint attention to present objects. Using the CHILDES database, we compared attention-directives…
Descriptors: Young Children, Peer Relationship, Interaction Process Analysis, Attention
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2005
The study explored early syntactic development, and tested the hypothesis that children use similarity of meaning in order to move beyond the learning of individual item-based multiword constructions. The first 6 types of verb-object (VO) constructions in Hebrew-speaking children were analysed for the occurrence of transfer of learning and…
Descriptors: Semantics, Verbs, Syntax, Transfer of Training
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 2004
In two experiments we tested the hypothesis that children have a basic problem in mastering the attributive relation because it involves a two-step logical-semantic integration process of the head-noun and the attributive adjective. Hebrew-speaking children were asked to interpret highly familiar adjective-noun combinations by selecting a photo…
Descriptors: Form Classes (Languages), Nouns, Experiments, Educational Research
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 1980
Ostensive definitions of words are ambiguities as to their referent. In a study of infant-mother dyads engaged in looking at picture books, 95 percent of ostensive definitions referred to the whole object depicted rather than parts, attributes, or actions. When parts were named, ambiguity was avoided by naming the part and the whole. (PJM)
Descriptors: Ambiguity, Child Language, Cognitive Processes, Language Acquisition
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 1999
Investigated the first verbs to participate in verb-object and subject-verb-object combinations and the temporal parameters of the spread of these combinations over different verbs, observing longitudinally young children acquiring English and Hebrew. Results indicated that the more verbs children already knew to combine in a certain pattern, the…
Descriptors: Child Development, Child Language, Hebrew, Language Acquisition
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Ninio, Anat – Journal of Child Language, 1992
Investigates the relationship between children's single word utterances and maternal single-word utterances expressing similar communicative intents in 24 Hebrew-speaking dyads (the children were aged about 1; 6). Results suggest that children's single-word utterances are similar to, and probably learned from, single-word utterances of caretakers…
Descriptors: Caregiver Speech, Children, Communication (Thought Transfer), Comparative Analysis
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Ninio, Anat; Bruner, Jerome – Journal of Child Language, 1978
The achievement of labeling was investigated in a longitudinal study of one mother-infant dyad, using video-recordings and analysis of joint picture-book reading. Participating in a ritualized dialogue, rather than imitation, was found to be the major mechanism through which labeling was achieved. (Author/SW)
Descriptors: Child Language, Language Acquisition, Language Research, Nonverbal Communication