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Babatsouli, Elena; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2019
Previous research in child language shows that many aspects of language acquisition are frequency-linked. This study tests whether input or usage frequency predicts the order of acquisition and accuracy of a bilingual Greek-English child's English possessives. The child was followed longitudinally from age 2;6 to 3;11. Order of acquisition was…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Greek, English (Second Language), Second Language Learning
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Barbosa, Poliana; Nicoladis, Elena; Keith, Margaux – Journal of Child Language, 2017
We investigated how bilinguals choose words in a narrative task, contrasting the possibilities of a developmental delay vs. compensatory strategies. To characterize a developmental delay, we compared younger (three to five years) and older (seven to ten years) children's lexicalization of target words (Study 1). The younger children told shorter…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Bilingual Students, Children, Lexicology
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Nicoladis, Elena; Gavrila, Andra – Journal of Child Language, 2015
Cross-linguistic influence (CLI) refers to the linguistic influence of one of a bilingual's languages while processing the other. Researchers have debated whether CLI is better explained by the structure of bilinguals' two languages or by a combination of processing demands and structure. In this study, we test if Welsh-English bilingual children…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Child Language, Welsh, English
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Keith, Margaux; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2013
This study tested whether bilingual children show a lag in semantic development (the schematic-categorical shift) relative to monolingual children due to smaller vocabularies within a language. Twenty French-English bilingual and twenty English monolingual children (seven to ten years old) participated in a picture-naming task in English. Their…
Descriptors: Semantics, Bilingualism, Monolingualism, Vocabulary Development
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Paradis, Johanne; Nicoladis, Elena; Crago, Martha; Genesee, Fred – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Bilingual and monolingual children's (mean age = 4;10) elicited production of the past tense in both English and French was examined in order to test predictions from Usage-Based theory regarding the sensitivity of children's acquisition rates to input factors such as variation in exposure time and the type/token frequency of morphosyntactic…
Descriptors: Monolingualism, French, Language Acquisition, Bilingualism
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Nicoladis, Elena; Paradis, Johanne – Journal of Child Language, 2011
Liaison and elision in French are phonological phenomena that apply across word boundaries. French-speaking children make errors in contexts where liaison/elision typically occurs in adult speech. In this study, we asked if acquisition of French liaison/elision can be explained in a constructivist framework. We tested if children's liaison/elision…
Descriptors: Evidence, Constructivism (Learning), Cues, Speech Communication
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Krott, Andrea; Gagne, Christina L.; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2010
The present study investigates children's bias when interpreting novel noun-noun compounds (e.g. "kig donka") that refer to combinations of novel objects (kig and donka). More specifically, it investigates children's understanding of modifier-head relations of the compounds and their preference for HAS or LOCATED relations (e.g. a donka that HAS a…
Descriptors: Nouns, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Child Language, Language Acquisition
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Krott, Andrea; Gagne, Christina L.; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2009
This study explores different frequency effects on children's interpretations of novel noun-noun compounds (e.g. "egg bag" as "bag FOR eggs"). We investigated whether four- to five-year-olds and adults use their knowledge of related compounds and their modifier-head relations (e.g. "sandwich bag (FOR)" or "egg white (PART-OF)") when explaining the…
Descriptors: Nouns, Language Processing, Child Language, Adults
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Nicoladis, Elena; Cornell, Edward H.; Gates, Melissa – Journal of Child Language, 2008
Two-year-old children often start asking questions with "where." In this study we test whether children understand "where" to mean route or absolute location and whether the size of the space or elevation made a difference. Previous research has documented developmental changes over the preschool years in children's non-verbal spatial reasoning.…
Descriptors: Schemata (Cognition), Spatial Ability, Young Children, Child Language
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Krott, Andrea; Nicoladis, Elena – Journal of Child Language, 2005
The family size of the constituents of compound words, or the number of compounds sharing the constituents, has been shown to affect adults' access to compound words in the mental lexicon. The present study was designed to see if family size would affect children's segmentation of compounds. Twenty-five English-speaking children between 3;7 and…
Descriptors: Phonology, Young Children, Language Processing, Vocabulary Development