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Kanero, Junko; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick – Journal of Child Language, 2016
Languages differ greatly in how they express causal events. In languages like Japanese, the subjects of causative sentences, or "causers," are generally animate and intentional, whereas in other languages like English, causers range widely from animate beings to inanimate objects (e.g. Wolff, Jeon & Li, 2009). This paper explores…
Descriptors: English, Japanese, Preschool Children, Task Analysis
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Can, Dilara Deniz; Ginsburg-Block, Marika; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn – Journal of Child Language, 2013
This longitudinal study examined the predictive validity of the MacArthur Communicative Developmental Inventories-Short Form (CDI-SF), a parent report questionnaire about children's language development (Fenson, Pethick, Renda, Cox, Dale & Reznick, 2000). Data were first gathered from parents on the CDI-SF vocabulary scores for seventy-six…
Descriptors: Semantics, Pragmatics, Word Recognition, Longitudinal Studies
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Ma, Weiyi; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; McDonough, Colleen; Tardif, Twila – Journal of Child Language, 2009
Verbs are harder to learn than nouns in English and in many other languages, but are relatively easy to learn in Chinese. This paper evaluates one potential explanation for these findings by examining the construct of imageability, or the ability of a word to produce a mental image. Chinese adults rated the imageability of Chinese words from the…
Descriptors: Verbs, Nouns, Chinese, Adults
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Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Alioto, Anthony – Journal of Child Language, 1995
This study used three experiments to study whether infant-directed (ID) or adult-directed (AD) speech facilitated the learning of Chinese vocabulary by adults whose native language was English and who had had no prior knowledge of Chinese. Results indicate that ID speech may play a pivotal role in early lexical acquisition. (51 references)…
Descriptors: College Students, Infants, Intonation, Mandarin Chinese
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Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; And Others – Journal of Child Language, 1994
Six lexical principles for object label learning are evaluated. In this framework, lexical acquisition changes as a result of the particular principles a given child has at his or her disposal. These principles were developed for the class of object labels but may also apply across other early-appearing word classes. (Contains 98 references.) (JP)
Descriptors: Child Language, Developmental Stages, Infants, Language Acquisition
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Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; And Others – Journal of Child Language, 1987
Three studies assessing language comprehension of infants and toddlers through a method requiring a minimum of motor movement, no speech production, and differential visual fixation of two simultaneously presented video events provide insight into children's emerging linguistic capabilities and help resolve controversies about language production…
Descriptors: Child Language, Correlation, Language Acquisition, Language Aptitude
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Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick – Journal of Child Language, 1986
Analysis of videotapes recorded of three preverbal infants' communication attempts with their mothers revealed three behaviors: Negotiations occurred when mothers helped infants make their intents clear; Immediate Successes occurred when mothers readily comprehended the infants' intents; and Missed Attempts occurred when the mother failed to…
Descriptors: Child Language, Communication Problems, Comprehension, Infants
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Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Markessini, Joan – Journal of Child Language, 1980
Thirty children with a mean length of utterance ranging from 1.00 to 4 and an age range of 1.7 to 5.5 were tested for comprehension of two-noun possessive phrases. Three types of possessive relationships were used to uncover children's knowledge of the semantics and syntax of English possession. (Author/AM)
Descriptors: Child Language, Comprehension, Grammar, Language Acquisition