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De Clerck, Ilke; Pettinato, Michele; Verhoeven, Jo; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2017
This study investigated the relation between lexical development and the production of prosodic prominence in disyllabic babble and words. Monthly recordings from nine typically developing Belgian-Dutch-speaking infants were analyzed from the onset of babbling until a cumulative vocabulary of 200 words was reached. The differentiation between the…
Descriptors: Longitudinal Studies, Language Acquisition, Child Language, Vocabulary Development
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van Severen, Lieve; Gillis, Joris J. M.; Molemans, Inge; van den Berg, Renate; De Maeyer, Sven; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2013
The impact of input frequency (IF) and functional load (FL) of segments in the ambient language on the acquisition order of word-initial consonants is investigated. Several definitions of IF/FL are compared and implemented. The impact of IF/FL and their components are computed using a longitudinal corpus of interactions between thirty…
Descriptors: Indo European Languages, Linguistic Input, Language Acquisition, Computational Linguistics
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Molemans, Inge; van den Berg, Renate; van Severen, Lieve; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2012
Various measures for identifying the onset of babbling have been proposed in the literature, but a formal definition of the exact procedure and a thorough validation of the sample size required for reliably establishing babbling onset is lacking. In this paper the reliability of five commonly used measures is assessed using a large longitudinal…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Sample Size, Validity, Infants
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Taelman, Helena; Durieux, Gert; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2009
A longitudinal analysis is presented of the fillers of a Dutch-speaking child between 1;10 and 2;7. Our analysis corroborates familiar regularities reported in the literature: most fillers resemble articles in shape and distribution, and are affected by rhythmic and positional constraints. A novel finding is the impact of the lexical environment:…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Indo European Languages, Longitudinal Studies, Child Language
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Taelman, Helena; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2008
Fikkert (1994) analyzed a large corpus of Dutch children's early language production, and found that they often add targetless syllables to their words in order to create bisyllabic feet. In this note we point out a methodological problem with that analysis: in an important number of cases, epenthetic vowels occur at places where grammatical…
Descriptors: Morphemes, Grammar, Child Language, Databases
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Gillis, Steven; Ravid, Dorit – Journal of Child Language, 2006
This study investigates the role of phonological and morphological information in children's developing orthographies in two languages with different linguistic typologies: Hebrew, a Semitic language with a highly synthetic morphology, and Dutch, a Germanic language with a sparse morphology. 192 Israeli and 192 Belgian monolingual schoolchildren…
Descriptors: Semitic Languages, Cues, Speech Communication, Spelling
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Wijnen, Frank; Kempen, Masja; Gillis, Steven – Journal of Child Language, 2001
Explores the possibility that the early predominance of infinitival forms in children acquiring Dutch as their first language is related to patterns in the language input. Analyzed a corpus of utterances addressed by two Dutch-speaking mothers to their 2- and 3-year-old sons. Root infinitive utterances amounted to 10%, and auxiliary-plus…
Descriptors: Child Language, Dutch, Foreign Countries, Language Acquisition
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Gillis, Steven; De Schutter, Georges – Journal of Child Language, 1996
Investigated whether children's syllabification of Dutch disyllabic words with a single intervocalic consonant adhered to the universal principles of syllable structure and whether these syllabifications witnessed an overruling of the universal phonological constraints by language-specific ones. Results indicate that universal principles explain…
Descriptors: Child Language, Consonants, Dutch, Elementary Education