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Karppinen, Seppo J. A. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2012
Adventure in school culture may seem quite a contradiction. In this paper I will present arguments on the idea that outdoor adventure learning contributes to formal education and is compatible with school practice and goals. This paper is based on research conducted for my thesis. The doctoral degree was completed at Oulu University, Finland, in…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, School Culture, Action Research, Focus Groups
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Collins, Loel; Collins, Dave – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2012
As a comparatively recent development, the adventure-sports coach struggles for a clear and distinct identity. The generic term "instructor" no longer characterizes the role and function of this subgroup of outdoor professionals. Indeed, although the fields of adventure/outdoor education and leadership are comparatively well researched,…
Descriptors: Outdoor Education, Comparative Analysis, Adventure Education, Leadership
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Dickson, Tracey J. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2008
Facilitating the reflection upon outdoor and adventure experiences is a common practice for many leaders and instructors. This article draws upon visual semiotics to provide reflections upon three images from books that originate from within the dominant North American paradigm. These musings are from one Antipodean's perspective, who may see the…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Semiotics, Experiential Learning, Literature Reviews
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Becker, Peter – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2007
Adventure is a playful pacemaker for real border crossings from reality to possibility; it can, from a benevolent point of view, be the trigger for individual changes of reality, a provider of impulses for the development of self. Confronted with the unpredictability of the wilderness, the turbulences of torrents, the chaotic state of the oceans,…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Experiential Learning, Philosophy, Imagination
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Nicol, Robbie – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
Deep ecology is suited to outdoor education because it depends on direct experience of the environment for self-realization to occur. Joining experiential, presentational, propositional, and practical ways of knowing with deep ecology creates an educational framework that will enable outdoor education to deliver outcomes relating to sustainability…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Environmental Education, Epistemology, Experiential Learning
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Beringer, Almut; Martin, Peter – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
The anthropomorphic paradigm in psychology and psychotherapy has prevented nature from being considered a factor in the curative relationship in adventure therapy. The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions are credited instead to human factors such as program design and facilitation. A paradigm shift is needed in adventure therapy to accept…
Descriptors: Criticism, Holistic Approach, Mental Health, Milieu Therapy
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Wurdinger, Scott; Paxton, Todd – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
Presents a model of four levels of experience in training adventure education leaders: direct instruction, student interaction in class, technical skill development, and internships. Internships allow students to think for themselves and solve real-world problems while experiencing teaching on their own. Utilizing all levels increases student…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Education Work Relationship, Educational Strategies, Experiential Learning
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Brookes, Andrew – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
"Neo-Hahnian" approaches to outdoor adventure education assume their programs "build character." Social psychology research has found that "character" is almost entirely illusory. Outdoor adventure education programs may provide situations that elicit certain behaviors, but the belief in character building must be…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Bias, Context Effect, Criticism
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Boyes, Michael A.; O'Hare, David – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
Decision making by outdoor adventure educators revolves around balancing risk and competence. A model of outdoor adventure decision making is presented that draws on naturalistic decision-making processes and emphasizes the importance of situational recognition and prior experience. Leaders draw key information from the natural environment,…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Case Studies, Context Effect, Decision Making
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Gillen, Mark C. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2003
Adventure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy share elements, including transformation of distorted thinking patterns, a focus on current and future functioning, consideration of the counselor-client relationship, and the use of stress in the change process. Recognizing cognitive behavioral therapy as an empirically sound theory underlying…
Descriptors: Adolescents, At Risk Persons, Behavior Change, Cognitive Restructuring
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Humberstone, Barbara – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2000
Highlights theories and concepts concerning gender and gender relations in modern society, applying some of these perspectives to outdoor education and adventure recreation. Argues that the more recent interactionist theories and cultural studies offer less deterministic and more insightful approaches to exploring people's outdoor and adventure…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Feminist Criticism, Foreign Countries, Gender Issues
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Boniface, Margaret R. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2000
People involved in adventurous activities frequently experience positive phenomena termed peak experience, peak performance, and "flow." Characteristics of these phenomena are compared, along with factors influencing the ability to experience such peak moments. Csikszentmihalyi's flow models are examined with regard to perceived levels…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Experiential Learning, Individual Development, Models
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Nicol, Robbie – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2002
Traces the development of school-based outdoor and adventure education in Scotland, 1970s-90s, focusing on changes in terminology, shifting objectives and increased practitioner training in response to safety concerns, the growth of residential outdoor education centers, and financial and curricular issues related to national changes. Points out…
Descriptors: Decentralization, Educational Change, Educational Philosophy, Educational Practices
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Loynes, Chris – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2002
The "algorithmic" model of outdoor experiential learning is based in military tradition and characterized by questionable scientific rationale, production line metaphor, and the notion of learning as marketable commodity. Alternatives are the moral paradigm; the ecological paradigm "friluftsliv"; and the emerging…
Descriptors: Criticism, Discovery Learning, Educational Philosophy, Experiential Learning
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Mathur, Atul – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2002
A practitioner providing experiential training programs in India reflects on models of training outcomes from the perspective of Indian philosophy about an individual's spiritual development. He suggests that development training programs serve their purpose if they can create moments of insight that might spark lasting change in participants. (SV)
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Experiential Learning, Foreign Countries, Individual Development
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