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Ritchie, Stephen D.; Wabano, Mary Jo; Corbiere, Rita G.; Restoule, Brenda M.; Russell, Keith C.; Young, Nancy L. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2015
Indigenous voices are largely silent in the outdoor education and adventure therapy literature. The purpose of this research collaboration was to understand how a 10-day outdoor adventure leadership experience (OALE) may promote resilience and well-being for Indigenous youth through their participation in the program. The process was examined…
Descriptors: Indigenous Populations, Canada Natives, American Indian Reservations, Ethnography
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Gassner, Michael E.; Russell, Keith C. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2008
This study examined the long-term impact of specific course components on participants who attended a 21-day Outward Bound Singapore course between 1997 and 2005. In total, 1029 questionnaires were sent out by mail. Participants were given a choice to complete the questionnaire on paper or online. A total of 318 questionnaires were successfully…
Descriptors: Adventure Education, Adults, Foreign Countries, Outdoor Education
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Russell, Keith C. – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2006
Wilderness therapy program theory is reasoned to be, as Weiss (1997) describes, a tacit theory, or one which is implied and not clearly articulated. This is evidenced by several meta-analyses which have consistently found either very limited or no detailed descriptions of the wilderness therapy programs under investigation. The purpose of this…
Descriptors: Grounded Theory, Participant Observation, Focus Groups, Physical Environment
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Russell, Keith C.; Farnum, Jen – Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 2004
Though wilderness therapy programs are growing in number and popularity, the theoretical basis for distinguishing wilderness therapy from traditional therapeutic modalities is lacking. Existing models describing the wilderness therapy process have been stage-based, meaning the process has been conceptualized as sequential and discrete. Lost in…
Descriptors: Physical Environment, Therapy, Physical Health, Models