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Puaca, Laura Micheletti – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
In the two decades following World War II, a loose network of home economists at colleges and universities across the United States turned their attention to homemaking methods for women with physical disabilities. Often in consultation with physically disabled homemakers, these home economists researched and designed assistive devices, adaptive…
Descriptors: Home Economics, Sex Role, Homemakers, Physical Disabilities
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Mullaney, Marie Marmo; Hilbert, Rosemary C. – History of Education Quarterly, 2018
Established in 1911 as a simple owner-operated commercial school in Providence, Rhode Island, the Katharine Gibbs School expanded over the decades to acquire an international reputation for excellence in secretarial training. This essay examines the origin, development, and ultimate demise of the chain, placing it within the context of the…
Descriptors: Womens Education, Females, Office Occupations, Gender Bias
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Sani, Roberto – History of Education Quarterly, 2013
The "Partial Agenda for Modern European Educational History" proposed by Albisetti focuses primarily on the nineteenth century, and on some large-scale trends and issues, such as those relating to education and secondary instruction for women. Discussing this issue implies--especially in the diverse and heterogeneous context of…
Descriptors: Educational History, Foreign Countries, Educational Trends, Trend Analysis
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Nash, Margaret A. – History of Education Quarterly, 2013
"The value of the Art Education becomes more and more apparent as a means of honorable support and of high culture and enjoyment," stated the catalog of Ingham University in western New York State in 1863. The Art Department there would prepare "pupils for Teachers and Practical Artists." This statement reveals some of the…
Descriptors: Females, Womens Education, Commercial Art, Art Education
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Marthers, Paul Philip – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
At the moment of its founding in 1911, Connecticut College for Women exhibited a curricular tension between an emphasis on the liberal arts, which mirrored the elite men's and women's colleges of the day, and vocational aspects, which made it a different type of women's college, one designed to prepare women for the kind of lives they would lead…
Descriptors: Home Economics, Curriculum Development, Single Sex Colleges, Womens Education
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Turpin, Andrea L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
Historical scholarship has traditionally focused on the commonalities uniting Catharine Beecher and Mary Lyon, the two leading antebellum women's educational reformers in New England. This essay shifts that focus by contrasting their educational philosophies and exploring the implications their differences had for the development of American…
Descriptors: Single Sex Colleges, Females, Educational History, Womens Education
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Gold, David – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
Scholars have long debated the complicity of Southern white women after the Civil War in helping create a racialist and racist regional identity and denying or delaying civil rights for African Americans. These studies have largely focused on the activities of elite white women property owners, club members, and writers. Yet few scholars have…
Descriptors: Race, Student Attitudes, Females, Racial Attitudes
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Manekin, Sarah – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
In the fall of 2001, with posters, tote bags, speakers, and balloons, the University of Pennsylvania launched its celebration of "125 Years of Women at Penn." Exhibits illustrating the experiences of women students appeared around campus and on the Web, while banners trumpeting the contributions of Penn women waved from lightposts. The…
Descriptors: Females, Exhibits, Access to Education, Internet
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Dorn, Charles – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
During World War II, female students at the University of California, Berkeley--then the most populous undergraduate campus in American higher education--made significant advances in collegiate life. In growing numbers, women enrolled in male-dominated academic programs, including mathematics, chemistry, and engineering, as they prepared for…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Activism, Females, War
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Thomas, Auden D. – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
Women's colleges in the 1970s and 1980s faced highly uncertain futures. Soaring popularity of coeducation left them with serious enrollment downturns, and challenges from proposed equal rights legislation threatened to render illegal their single-sex admissions policies. These perilous external conditions drew together the presidents of U.S.…
Descriptors: Oral History, Higher Education, Females, Philanthropic Foundations
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Johnson, Joan Marie – History of Education Quarterly, 2007
At the turn of the century approximately a thousand white Southern women braved the consternation of friends and sometimes family, and traveled hundreds of miles to attend the best Northern women's colleges for an education unavailable to them in the South. For many, the experience was revolutionary: they developed self-confidence, independence,…
Descriptors: Females, Womens Education, Higher Education, Single Sex Colleges
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Eisenmann, Linda – History of Education Quarterly, 2005
This article reflects on three narratives that affected American women's participation in higher education during the first twenty years after World War II. In hindsight, the educators of the 1950s and early 1960s may seem gratuitously meek and self-effacing. In comparison to later efforts, their activism can appear unnecessarily limited and too…
Descriptors: Activism, Females, Higher Education, War