NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing all 14 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Liu, Qing – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
While educating international students is celebrated as a means of promoting mutual understanding among nations, American higher education has always been entangled with geopolitics. This essay focuses on Tang Tsou, the Chinese scholar who came to the United States as a student in 1941, eventually becoming the nation's leading China expert and…
Descriptors: Political Attitudes, Political Science, Foreign Students, Educational History
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Loss, Christopher P. – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
America's sprawling system of colleges and universities has been built on the ruins of war. After the American Revolution the cash-strapped central government sold land grants to raise revenue and build colleges and schools in newly conquered lands. During the Civil War, the federal government built on this earlier precedent when it passed the…
Descriptors: Higher Education, War, World History, United States History
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nash, Margaret A. – History of Education Quarterly, 2019
Land-grant colleges were created in the mid-nineteenth century when the federal government sold off public lands and allowed states to use that money to create colleges. The land that was sold to support colleges was available because of a deliberate project to dispossess American Indians of land they inhabited. By encouraging westward migration,…
Descriptors: Land Grant Universities, American Indian History, Educational History, Land Settlement
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Mullaney, Marie Marmo; Hilbert, Rosemary C. – History of Education Quarterly, 2018
Established in 1911 as a simple owner-operated commercial school in Providence, Rhode Island, the Katharine Gibbs School expanded over the decades to acquire an international reputation for excellence in secretarial training. This essay examines the origin, development, and ultimate demise of the chain, placing it within the context of the…
Descriptors: Womens Education, Females, Office Occupations, Gender Bias
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Fiss, Andrew – History of Education Quarterly, 2017
In nineteenth-century America, students buried their mathematics books. This practice consistently celebrated the milestone of passing through collegiate mathematics, yet it changed due to national events. This article considers the case of Bowdoin College, where students buried their books differently before and after the Civil War. Antebellum,…
Descriptors: Educational History, Mathematics Instruction, Textbooks, College Mathematics
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nemeth, Julian – History of Education Quarterly, 2017
Sidney Hook set the terms of debate on Communism, higher education, and academic freedom in the postwar United States. His view that Communists lacked the independence necessary for teaching and research--a view forged in the heated debates of New York City's radical left in the 1930s--provided the rationale for firing Communist professors across…
Descriptors: Social Systems, Academic Freedom, Educational History, United States History
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Maher, Brent D. – History of Education Quarterly, 2016
The National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 was the first federal investment in low-interest student loans and became a precedent for expansion of student loans in the Higher Education Act of 1965. In its controversial loyalty provisions, the NDEA required loan recipients to affirm loyalty to the U.S. government. Between 1958 and 1962,…
Descriptors: Educational Legislation, Federal Legislation, National Security, Student Loan Programs
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Wong, Ting-Hong – History of Education Quarterly, 2016
Focusing only on education exchanges between the United States and other countries, existing scholarship fails to illuminate how American-sponsored student migrations between other countries helped expand U.S. hegemony. This article attempts to rectify this limitation by looking at Taiwan's policies on overseas Chinese students (qiaosheng) in the…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, College Admission, Competition, Foreign Students
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Dunn, Joe P. – History of Education Quarterly, 2012
Inspired by Manifest Destiny and lured by prospects of economic gain, Eastern entrepreneurs migrated to the Western frontier in the mid nineteenth century. As they pursued wealth through railroads, mining, land speculation, and other endeavors, many succeeded and had their names recorded in the pages of the history of the region; others passed…
Descriptors: Liberal Arts, United States History, War, Church Related Colleges
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Spillman, Scott – History of Education Quarterly, 2012
Christine Ladd-Franklin spent the first forty years of her life becoming one of the best-educated women in nineteenth-century America. She spent the rest of her life devising fellowship programs designed to enable educated women to have the same opportunities as men in their academic careers. The difficulty women had in becoming professors had a…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, United States History, Educational History, Access to Education
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Justice, Benjamin – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
They sat in the Cubberley Education Lecture Hall to hear visiting experts. More often they could be found meeting in reduced-size classes, or working on small-group activities. They usually took notes; sometimes they took field trips. They memorized lists and sat for exams, but they also watched films and acted out scenarios. Rather than take…
Descriptors: United States History, War, Global Approach, Cooperative Learning
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Breaux, Richard M. – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
This essay examines the college lives of two generations of Iowa's black college women in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It focuses on the experiences of black women at Iowa's private colleges and the University of Iowa (UI) from 1878 to 1928. The experiences of black women in Iowa's colleges and universities are important for…
Descriptors: Private Colleges, Females, White Students, African American Students
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Angulo, A. J. – History of Education Quarterly, 2005
The author introduces William Barton Rogers, conceptual founder of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who pursued two interrelated careers in nineteenth-century America: one centered on his activities in science and the other on his higher educational reform efforts. This essay explores one theme in Rogers' scientific and educational…
Descriptors: United States History, Slavery, Careers, Higher Education
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nelson, Adam R. – History of Education Quarterly, 2005
In 1979, fourteen years after publishing his landmark work, "The Emergence of the American University," Laurence R. Veysey wrote a forward-looking article for the "American Quarterly" titled "The Autonomy of American History Reconsidered." In his article, Veysey suggested that the time had come to rewrite American…
Descriptors: United States History, Universities, Higher Education, Educational History