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Pearce, Joanna L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
Nineteenth-century educators worried that blind children were particularly susceptible to moral apathy, religious decay, and atheism because they could not see the beauty of nature. These educators used instruction in biology, zoology, and natural history to teach blind children about the beauty of the natural world and the breadth of God's…
Descriptors: Blindness, Educational History, Science Education, Students with Disabilities
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Gemmell, K. M. – History of Education Quarterly, 2019
Progressive education swept across Canada in the early to mid-twentieth century, restructuring schools, introducing new courses, and urging teachers to reorient the classroom to the interests and needs of the learner. The women religious who taught in Vancouver's Catholic schools negotiated the revised public school curriculum, determined to…
Descriptors: Catholic Schools, Religious Education, Progressive Education, Catholic Educators
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Scribner, Campbell F. – History of Education Quarterly, 2012
The launch of "Sputnik" in 1957 sparked a crisis in American education. Suddenly threatened by superior Soviet technology, progressive educators' concern for children's preferences, health, and adjustment in school yielded to public demands for more basic learning and academic skills. Congress soon passed the National Defense Education Act,…
Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Social Systems, National Security, War
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Justice, Benjamin – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
They sat in the Cubberley Education Lecture Hall to hear visiting experts. More often they could be found meeting in reduced-size classes, or working on small-group activities. They usually took notes; sometimes they took field trips. They memorized lists and sat for exams, but they also watched films and acted out scenarios. Rather than take…
Descriptors: United States History, War, Global Approach, Cooperative Learning
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Marthers, Paul Philip – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
At the moment of its founding in 1911, Connecticut College for Women exhibited a curricular tension between an emphasis on the liberal arts, which mirrored the elite men's and women's colleges of the day, and vocational aspects, which made it a different type of women's college, one designed to prepare women for the kind of lives they would lead…
Descriptors: Home Economics, Curriculum Development, Single Sex Colleges, Womens Education
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Laats, Adam – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
The world of private fundamentalist education grew prodigiously throughout the late 1970s and into the early 1980s. These schools needed curricular materials and guiding educational philosophies. The impassioned debates among leading fundamentalist educators directly affected the education of hundreds of thousands of students. Concern over the…
Descriptors: Day Schools, Educational Philosophy, Curriculum Development, Christianity
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Nivison, Kenneth – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
In 1827, two years after its incorporation as a college and six years removed from its founding as a "collegiate institution," Amherst College revamped its curriculum into what it called a "parallel course of study." In this new scheme, students were allowed to follow one of two tracks during their college years. Amherst's…
Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Colleges, Educational History, Educational Improvement
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Pak, Michael S. – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
Of the classic documents addressing issues in higher education, few have provoked as much commentary as the Yale Report of 1828--and perhaps fewer still have been subject to such undeserved infamy. Today, the document requires a thorough new reading. Since the late 1960s historians of higher education have been trying to overturn the traditional…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Intellectual History, Educational History, Educational Practices
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Yarrow, Andrew L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
During the twenty to twenty-five years after World War II, children in the United States were increasingly taught to understand their nation, its history, and its economic greatness--as an "economy"--rather than in social, moral, philosophical, or political terms. During this time period, not only did an economics education movement…
Descriptors: Textbooks, Economics Education, War, Instructional Materials
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Thakur, Yoko H. – History of Education Quarterly, 1995
Observes that, although textbook reform in occupied Japan originally supported democratic principles of openness and competition, it later became a mechanism for anticommunist censorship. Maintains that interpretations of Japan's military conduct remain highly politicized and controversial. (MJP)
Descriptors: Censorship, Controversial Issues (Course Content), Curriculum Development, Democratic Values
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Cohen, Sol – History of Education Quarterly, 1983
Few intellectual and social movements of this century have had so pervasive an influence on the theory and practice of American education as the mental hygiene movement. This movement substantially altered ways of thinking about education, in particular, the school's responsibility for children's personality development. The movement's history is…
Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Educational Change, Educational History, Educational Objectives
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Tolley, Kim – History of Education Quarterly, 1996
Presents a consistent body of evidence to support the conclusion that, from the earliest decades of the 19th century, scientific subjects represented a significant and popular part of the curriculum in schools for girls. Includes evidence from primary and secondary sources. (MJP)
Descriptors: Cultural Education, Cultural Influences, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Evaluation
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Dzuback, Mary Ann – History of Education Quarterly, 1993
Explores the origins and development of the Graduate Department of Social Economy and Social Research at Bryn Mawr College, PA. Analyzes social science teaching and research fostered in the department. Includes two tables listing women who received doctorates from the department between 1915 and 1940 along with a faculty listing. (CFR)
Descriptors: Course Descriptions, Curriculum Development, Educational History, Females
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Angus, David L.; Mirel, Jeffrey E. – History of Education Quarterly, 1993
Asserts that the question of whether high school students should follow a uniform academic program or choose options from a differentiated curriculum has reemerged as a crucial issue. Describes how the Detroit (Michigan) Public Schools enrolled most students in a "general" track that did little to meet actual student needs. (CFR)
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Black Culture, Blacks, Curriculum Development
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Axelrod, Paul – History of Education Quarterly, 1996
Summarizes the various interpretations and representations of Canadian educational history in textbooks and other scholarly publications from the last 20 years. Charts the appearance in educational history of intellectual and social history, as well as minority and feminist considerations. (MJP)
Descriptors: Curriculum Development, Educational Development, Educational History, Educational Objectives
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