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Fultz, Michael – History of Education Quarterly, 2021
This paper explores trends in summer and intermittent teaching practices among African American students in the post-Civil War South, focusing on student activities in the field, the institutions they attended, and the communities they served. Transitioning out of the restrictions and impoverishment of slavery while simultaneously seeking to…
Descriptors: African American Teachers, Educational History, African American Students, African American Education
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Smith, Troy A. – History of Education Quarterly, 2021
This article examines the workings of Hampton Institute's external relations program to show how the school developed loyal supporters and donors. By 1900, Hampton was the wealthiest school for African Americans, and its philosophy--stressing vocational education and forsaking political equality--was at its most influential during this time,…
Descriptors: Black Colleges, Educational Finance, Fund Raising, Private Financial Support
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Ladson-Billings, Gloria; Anderson, James D. – History of Education Quarterly, 2021
In the second half of the twentieth century, the ranks of Black teachers and school administrators declined precipitously. Today, less than 7 percent of American teachers are Black. This loss has had a number of consequences for schools and communities, but perhaps especially for Black students. As recent research has found, Black students benefit…
Descriptors: African American Teachers, Teacher Shortage, Futures (of Society), Educational Trends
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Zelbo, Sian – History of Education Quarterly, 2019
When the New Orleans school board appointed E. J. Edmunds, a light-skinned Afro-Creole man, the mathematics teacher for the city's best high school in 1875, the senior students walked out rather than have a "negro" as a teacher of "white youths." Edmunds's appointment was a final, bold act by the city's mixed-race intellectual…
Descriptors: Educational History, United States History, African American Teachers, Racial Bias
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Nocera, Amato – History of Education Quarterly, 2018
This paper examines an "experimental" program in African American adult education that took place at the Harlem branch of the New York Public Library in the early 1930s. The program, called the Harlem Experiment, brought together a group of white funders (the Carnegie Corporation and the American Association for Adult Education)--who…
Descriptors: African American Education, Adult Education, Afrocentrism, Public Libraries
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Beilke, Jayne R. – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
This essay reviews two books on Julius Rosenwald and the Rosenwald Fund and places them within the historiography of the Fund. "Julius Rosenwald: The Man Who Built Sears, Roebuck and Advanced the Cause of Black Education in the American South," is a biography written by Peter M. Ascoli. The book entitled "The Rosenwald Schools of…
Descriptors: United States History, Historiography, Rural Schools, African American Education
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Delmont, Matthew – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
This article features Ruth Wright Hayre, Philadelphia's first black high school teacher and principal whose work at William Penn High School for Girls became a model for counseling and motivation programs at other majority-black high schools in Philadelphia, expanding educational and career opportunities for thousands of "able" students.…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Educational Opportunities, Change Agents, Change Strategies
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Crocco, Margaret Smith; Waite, Cally L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2007
Recent historiography has documented the singular contributions made by women to racial uplift and progress during the Jim Crow era. In these endeavors, women's contributions were greatly shaped by race, gender, and class. Given the feminization of education in the United States during this time, it is not surprising that their "race work" was for…
Descriptors: Gender Discrimination, Racial Discrimination, African Americans, Females
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Alridge, Derrick P. – History of Education Quarterly, 2007
Anna Julia Cooper and W.E.B. Du Bois were two of the most prominent African-American educators of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During this period, they both envisioned a broad education tailored specifically to the critical intellectual and vocational needs of the entire black community. In this essay, the author examines common themes…
Descriptors: African American Education, Educational Philosophy, Social Change, Womens Education
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Beyer, C. Kalani – History of Education Quarterly, 2007
Samuel Chapman Armstrong is well known for establishing Hampton Institute, the institution most involved with training black teachers in the South after the Civil War. It is less known that he was born in Hawai'i to the missionary couple Reverend Richard and Clarissa Chapman Armstrong. His parents were members of the Fifth Company of missionaries…
Descriptors: Industrial Education, Hawaiians, African American Education, Teacher Education
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Johnson, Larry; Cobb-Roberts, Deirdre; Shircliffe, Barbara – History of Education Quarterly, 2007
The history of public higher education for African Americans in Florida provides an excellent opportunity to examine American institutional and political dynamics. Following World War II, Florida public higher education expanded dramatically, while at the same time, state leaders maintained racial segregation well after "Brown v. Board of…
Descriptors: African American Education, Public Education, Higher Education, Racial Segregation
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Fultz, Michael – History of Education Quarterly, 2004
In 1951, three brief commentaries in the "Journal of Negro Education" drew public attention to the potentially tenuous job security of African-American educators in the South, Black professionals whose employment status was being called into question as southern educational institutions faced the prospect of desegregation. The specific incident…
Descriptors: Job Security, African American Education, African American Teachers, Employment Level
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Lowe, Robert – History of Education Quarterly, 2004
Although it is obligatory to mark the anniversary of "Brown v. Board of Education," why it deserves to be commemorated is not necessarily obvious at a distance of fifty years. In this article, the author discusses this issue in the light of Richard Kluger's remarkable book--"Simple Justice." He states that, today the widespread existence of…
Descriptors: Equal Education, School Desegregation, Racial Identification, Court Litigation
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Perlstein, Daniel – History of Education Quarterly, 2004
This article traces back to the time when virtually no educational research or policymaking takes integration seriously, when the courts regularly declare segregated districts unitary, when the rhetoric of race-blind social justice has been abandoned by the left and appropriated by the opponents of equality. This leads students' and other…
Descriptors: Politics of Education, Educational History, School Desegregation, Equal Education
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Williamson, Joy Ann – History of Education Quarterly, 2004
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their students played a pivotal part in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and early 1960s. Private HBCUs, in particular, provided foot soldiers, intellectual leadership, and safe places to meet and plan civil disobedience. Their economic and political autonomy from the state enabled the…
Descriptors: Black Colleges, Institutional Autonomy, Civil Rights, Educational History