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Showing 1 to 15 of 27 results Save | Export
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Liu, Qing – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
While educating international students is celebrated as a means of promoting mutual understanding among nations, American higher education has always been entangled with geopolitics. This essay focuses on Tang Tsou, the Chinese scholar who came to the United States as a student in 1941, eventually becoming the nation's leading China expert and…
Descriptors: Political Attitudes, Political Science, Foreign Students, Educational History
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Pearce, Joanna L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2020
Nineteenth-century educators worried that blind children were particularly susceptible to moral apathy, religious decay, and atheism because they could not see the beauty of nature. These educators used instruction in biology, zoology, and natural history to teach blind children about the beauty of the natural world and the breadth of God's…
Descriptors: Blindness, Educational History, Science Education, Students with Disabilities
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Balmforth, Mark E. – History of Education Quarterly, 2019
Emma Willard's map-drawing geographic pedagogy revolutionized early nineteenth-century American education, turning students into participants in the crafting of the new nation. This essay explores the conditions under which map drawing was transported to American missionary schools in South Asia and helped instigate a Tamil nation in British…
Descriptors: Cartography, Geography Instruction, Educational History, Maps
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Moon, Krystyn R. – History of Education Quarterly, 2018
This essay explores the experiences and debates surrounding preparatory schools for Chinese students in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century. These institutions attempted to expand educational opportunities for poorer Chinese students who might otherwise not have had a chance to go to school; however, most of these children also…
Descriptors: Asian Americans, Low Income Students, Access to Education, Racial Bias
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Wong, Ting-Hong – History of Education Quarterly, 2016
Focusing only on education exchanges between the United States and other countries, existing scholarship fails to illuminate how American-sponsored student migrations between other countries helped expand U.S. hegemony. This article attempts to rectify this limitation by looking at Taiwan's policies on overseas Chinese students (qiaosheng) in the…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, College Admission, Competition, Foreign Students
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Koganzon, Rita – History of Education Quarterly, 2012
One of the vexing ambiguities in the historiography of the civic republican tradition has been just when and how republicanism ended. The American Revolution itself, according to Gordon Wood and J. G. A. Pocock, was waged for republican principles, but the government established in its wake represented what Wood called "the end of classical…
Descriptors: Historiography, United States History, Educational History, Ideology
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Spillman, Scott – History of Education Quarterly, 2012
Christine Ladd-Franklin spent the first forty years of her life becoming one of the best-educated women in nineteenth-century America. She spent the rest of her life devising fellowship programs designed to enable educated women to have the same opportunities as men in their academic careers. The difficulty women had in becoming professors had a…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, United States History, Educational History, Access to Education
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Justice, Benjamin – History of Education Quarterly, 2011
They sat in the Cubberley Education Lecture Hall to hear visiting experts. More often they could be found meeting in reduced-size classes, or working on small-group activities. They usually took notes; sometimes they took field trips. They memorized lists and sat for exams, but they also watched films and acted out scenarios. Rather than take…
Descriptors: United States History, War, Global Approach, Cooperative Learning
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Kumano, Ruriko – History of Education Quarterly, 2010
In August 1945, Imperial Japan surrendered to the Allied Powers. From September 1945 to April 1952, the United States occupied the defeated country. Douglas MacArthur, an American army general and the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers (SCAP), attempted to transform Japanese society from an authoritarian regime into a budding democracy.…
Descriptors: Freedom of Speech, Academic Freedom, Democracy, Schools
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Sargeant, Lynn M. – History of Education Quarterly, 2009
In this article, the author compares the music education in the United States and the Russian Empire at the turn of the twentieth century. In both countries, music educators struggled to secure a permanent role for vocal music in the school. By comparing Russian music instruction to that in the United States, educators can better understand not…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Music Education, Music Teachers, Music
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Yarrow, Andrew L. – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
During the twenty to twenty-five years after World War II, children in the United States were increasingly taught to understand their nation, its history, and its economic greatness--as an "economy"--rather than in social, moral, philosophical, or political terms. During this time period, not only did an economics education movement…
Descriptors: Textbooks, Economics Education, War, Instructional Materials
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Jaroszynska-Kirchmann, Anna D. – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
"Ameryka-Echo" was one of the most popular Polish-language weeklies, published in the United States between 1889 and 1972. Its founder and owner, Antoni A. Paryski, consciously sought to transplant ideas of Polish Positivism to the Polish-American immigrant communities in the United States. Reading was a central concept of…
Descriptors: Publishing Industry, Polish Americans, Immigrants, Social Systems
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Dorn, Charles – History of Education Quarterly, 2008
During World War II, female students at the University of California, Berkeley--then the most populous undergraduate campus in American higher education--made significant advances in collegiate life. In growing numbers, women enrolled in male-dominated academic programs, including mathematics, chemistry, and engineering, as they prepared for…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Activism, Females, War
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Tolley, Kim; Beadie, Nancy – History of Education Quarterly, 2006
Much good work has recently been done on the socioeconomic history of teaching in the United States, particularly in relation to the "feminization" of the profession that occurred over the course of the nineteenth century. This article brings together evidence from disparate local sources in both North Carolina and New York to explore…
Descriptors: Teacher Recruitment, Advertising, Travel, Teacher Employment
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Terzian, Sevan G. – History of Education Quarterly, 2006
A host of scholars have illuminated the ways in which schools and other institutions have created and then sustained a vast gender gap in the scientific professions. Many of these studies have focused on overt discrimination: deliberate efforts by men to prevent the entry of women into scientific pursuits. Others have identified subtle and…
Descriptors: Science Careers, Females, High School Students, Women Scientists
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