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Showing 1 to 15 of 224 results Save | Export
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Zhou, Peng; Ma, Weiyi; Zhan, Likan – First Language, 2020
The present study investigated whether Mandarin-speaking preschool children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were able to use prosodic cues to understand others' communicative intentions. Using the visual world eye-tracking paradigm, the study found that unlike typically developing (TD) 4-year-olds, both 4-year-olds with ASD and 5-year-olds…
Descriptors: Mandarin Chinese, Preschool Children, Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders
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Tulviste, Tiia; Schults, Astra – First Language, 2020
Parental reports are a widely-used source of information about infants' and toddlers' communicative skills, but parent-report instruments valid for children older than 30 months are less known. This study explored individual variability in children's communicative skills at the age of 3;0 via parental reports using the Estonian (E) CDI-III. The…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Finno Ugric Languages, Young Children, Language Acquisition
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Suzuki, Takaaki; Nomura, Jun – First Language, 2020
Mental state terms are believed to be closely related to the development of Theory of Mind (ToM). This study focuses on mental state verbs (MSVs) and investigates how they are used by Japanese-speaking mother-child dyads compared to their English-speaking counterparts. Analyses of their spontaneous speech from the CHILDES archives show that…
Descriptors: Verbs, Mothers, Parent Child Relationship, Foreign Countries
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White, Katherine S.; Nilsen, Elizabeth S.; Deglint, Taylor; Silva, Janel – First Language, 2020
Disfluencies, such as 'um' or 'uh', can cause adults to attribute uncertainty to speakers, but may also facilitate speech processing. To understand how these different functions affect children's learning, we asked whether (dis)fluency affects children's decision to select information from speakers (an explicit behavior) and their learning of…
Descriptors: Language Fluency, Language Acquisition, Young Children, Puppetry
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Childers, Jane B.; Porter, Blaire; Dolan, Megan; Whitehead, Clare B.; McIntyre, Kevin P. – First Language, 2020
To learn a verb, children must attend to objects and relations, often within a dynamic scene. Several studies show that comparing varied events linked to a verb helps children learn verbs, but there is also controversy in this area. This study asks whether children benefit from seeing variation across events as they learn a new verb, and uses an…
Descriptors: Verbs, Attention, Language Acquisition, Eye Movements
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Blom, Elma; Boerma, Tessel; Bosma, Evelyn; Cornips, Leonie; van den Heuij, Kirsten; Timmermeister, Mona – First Language, 2020
Various studies have shown that bilingual children score lower than their monolingual peers on standardized receptive vocabulary tests. This study investigates if this effect is moderated by language distance. Dutch receptive vocabulary was tested with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT). The impact of cross-language distance was examined…
Descriptors: Transfer of Training, Bilingualism, At Risk Students, Vocabulary Development
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Jones, Samuel David – First Language, 2020
High rates of error and variability in early word production may signal speech sound disorder. However, there is little consensus regarding the degree of error and variability that may be expected in the typical range. Relatedly, while variables including child age, word frequency and word phonological neighbourhood density are associated with…
Descriptors: Native Language, Age Differences, Vocabulary Development, Computational Linguistics
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de Koning, Björn B.; Wassenburg, Stephanie I.; Ganushchak, Lesya Y.; Krijnen, Eke; van Steensel, Roel – First Language, 2020
The ability to deduce implicit information about relations in a text (i.e., inferencing) is essential to understanding that text. Hence, there is increasing attention for supporting inferencing skills among children in early literacy programs including shared book reading interventions. This study investigated whether embedding scripted…
Descriptors: Inferences, Intervention, Parent Child Relationship, Story Reading
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Pejovic, Jovana; Yee, Eiling; Molnar, Monika – First Language, 2020
In the language development literature, studies often make inferences about infants' speech perception abilities based on their responses to a single speaker. However, there can be significant natural variability across speakers in how speech is produced (i.e., inter-speaker differences). The current study examined whether inter-speaker…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, Speech Communication, Auditory Perception
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Rosemberg, Celia Renata; Alam, Florencia; Audisio, Cynthia Pamela; Ramirez, María Laura; Garber, Leandro; Migdalek, Maia Julieta – First Language, 2020
This article examines the input to Argentinian Spanish-learning children from low and middle socioeconomic status (SES). It aims to determine whether the vocabulary composition (nouns and verbs) of their input varies as a function of SES, the addressee and other contextual variables such as the type of activity and the pragmatic orientation of the…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Spanish, Vocabulary Development, Nouns
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Luo, Rufan; Escobar, Kelly; Tamis-LeMonda, Catherine S. – First Language, 2020
We longitudinally examined the trajectories of Latine mothers' (N = 116) language input to their children during book-sharing interactions at four points in development, when children were between ages 2 and 5 years. Mother-child dyads were video-recorded sharing a wordless picture book, and transcriptions of mothers' and children's language…
Descriptors: Hispanic Americans, Mothers, Bilingualism, Parent Child Relationship
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Wall, Jenna L.; Merriman, William E. – First Language, 2020
When taught a label for an object, and later asked whether that object or a novel object is the referent of a novel label, preschoolers favor the novel object. This article examines whether this so-called disambiguation effect may be undermined by an expectation to communicate about a discovery. This expectation may explain why 4-year-olds do not…
Descriptors: Pragmatics, Native Language, Language Acquisition, Preschool Children
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van Berkel-van Hoof, Lian; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo – First Language, 2020
Previous research found a beneficial effect of augmentative signs (signs from a sign language used alongside speech) on spoken word learning by signing deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. The present study compared oral DHH children, and hearing children in a condition with babble noise in order to investigate whether prolonged experience…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Hearing Impairments, Deafness, Sign Language
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Veneziano, Edy; Le Normand, Marie-Thérèse; Plumet, Marie-Helène; Elie-Deschamps, Juliette – First Language, 2020
Previous studies of narrative development based on wordless picture stories indicate that before 7-8 years most children provide descriptive narratives with little inferential content such as explanations and attribution of mental states to the story characters. These components find greater expression in studies where children participated in…
Descriptors: French, Language Skills, Young Children, Primary Education
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Leonard, Laurence B. – First Language, 2019
There is growing evidence that the grammatical errors reflected in the speech of young children are often related to the nature of the input in the ambient language. Although theoretical frameworks differ in the degree to which input plays a role, there is acknowledgment that children require more input than previously assumed to resolve apparent…
Descriptors: Syntax, Morphemes, Children, Language Impairments
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