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Schröder, Elin; Gredebäck, Gustaf; Gunnarsson, Jessica; Lindskog, Marcus – Developmental Science, 2020
Motor experiences and active exploration during early childhood may affect individual differences in a wide range of perceptual and cognitive abilities. In the current study, we suggest that active exploration of objects facilitates the ability to process object forms and magnitudes, which in turn impacts the development of numerosity perception.…
Descriptors: Infants, Intervention, Play, Eye Movements
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Fletcher, Fay E.; Knowland, Victoria; Walker, Sarah; Gaskell, M. Gareth; Norbury, Courtenay; Henderson, Lisa M. – Developmental Science, 2020
Sleep is known to support the neocortical consolidation of declarative memory, including the acquisition of new language. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often characterized by both sleep and language learning difficulties, but few studies have explored a potential connection between the two. Here, 54 children with and without ASD (matched on…
Descriptors: Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Sleep, Neurological Impairments
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Ackermann, Lena; Hepach, Robert; Mani, Nivedita – Developmental Science, 2020
The overall pattern of vocabulary development is relatively similar across children learning different languages. However, there are considerable differences in the words known to individual children. Historically, this variability has been explained in terms of differences in the input. Here, we examine the alternate possibility that children's…
Descriptors: Children, Vocabulary Development, Learner Engagement, Childhood Interests
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Chen, Chi-hsin; Castellanos, Irina; Yu, Chen; Houston, Derek M. – Developmental Science, 2020
Coordinated attention between children and their parents plays an important role in their social, language, and cognitive development. The current study used head-mounted eye-trackers to investigate the effects of children's prelingual hearing loss on how they achieve coordinated attention with their hearing parents during free-flowing object…
Descriptors: Attention, Parent Child Relationship, Child Development, Eye Movements
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Mercure, Evelyne; Kushnerenko, Elena; Goldberg, Laura; Bowden-Howl, Harriet; Coulson, Kimberley; Johnson, Mark H; MacSweeney, Mairéad – Developmental Science, 2019
Infants as young as 2 months can integrate audio and visual aspects of speech articulation. A shift of attention from the eyes towards the mouth of talking faces occurs around 6 months of age in monolingual infants. However, it is unknown whether this pattern of attention during audiovisual speech processing is influenced by speech and language…
Descriptors: Infants, Bilingualism, Auditory Stimuli, Visual Stimuli
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Yu, Chen; Suanda, Sumarga H.; Smith, Linda B. – Developmental Science, 2019
Vocabulary differences early in development are highly predictive of later language learning as well as achievement in school. Early word learning emerges in the context of tightly coupled social interactions between the early learner and a mature partner. In the present study, we develop and apply a novel paradigm--dual head-mounted eye…
Descriptors: Infants, Infant Behavior, Attention Control, Eye Movements
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Slone, Lauren K.; Smith, Linda B.; Yu, Chen – Developmental Science, 2019
Object names are a major component of early vocabularies and learning object names depends on being able to visually recognize objects in the world. However, the fundamental visual challenge of the moment-to-moment variations in object appearances that learners must resolve has received little attention in word learning research. Here we provide…
Descriptors: Vocabulary Development, Infants, Object Permanence, Recognition (Psychology)
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Singh, Leher; Quinn, Paul C.; Xiao, Naiqi G.; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingualism exerts early and pervasive effects on cognition, observable in infancy. Thus far, investigations of infant bilingual cognition have focused on sensitivity to visual memory, executive function, and linguistic sensitivity. Much less research has focused on how bilingualism impacts processing of social cues. The present study sought to…
Descriptors: Monolingualism, Bilingualism, Infants, Racial Bias
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Comishen, Kyle J.; Bialystok, Ellen; Adler, Scott A. – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingualism has been observed to influence cognitive processing across the lifespan but whether bilingual environments have an effect on selective attention and attention strategies in infancy remains an unresolved question. In Study 1, infants exposed to monolingual or bilingual environments participated in an eye-tracking cueing task in which…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Infants, Monolingualism, Eye Movements
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Hernik, Mikolaj; Broesch, Tanya – Developmental Science, 2019
Gaze is considered a crucial component of early communication between an infant and her caregiver. When communicatively addressed, infants respond aptly to others' gaze by following its direction. However, experience with face-to-face contact varies across cultures, begging the question whether infants' competencies in receiving others'…
Descriptors: Infants, Eye Movements, Interpersonal Communication, Cultural Influences
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Zhang, Felicia; Jaffe-Dax, Sagi; Wilson, Robert C.; Emberson, Lauren L. – Developmental Science, 2019
Adults use both bottom-up sensory inputs and top-down signals to generate predictions about future sensory inputs. Infants have also been shown to make predictions with simple stimuli and recent work has suggested top-down processing is available early in infancy. However, it is unknown whether this indicates that top-down prediction is an ability…
Descriptors: Prediction, Infants, Adults, Eye Movements
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Chang, Lucas M.; Deák, Gedeon O. – Developmental Science, 2019
Infant language learning depends on the distribution of co-occurrences "within" language--between words and other words--and "between" language content and events in the world. Yet infant-directed speech is not limited to words that refer to perceivable objects and actions. Rather, caregivers' utterances contain a range of…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, Speech Communication, Play
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Birulés, Joan; Bosch, Laura; Brieke, Ricarda; Pons, Ferran; Lewkowicz, David J. – Developmental Science, 2019
Previous findings indicate that bilingual Catalan/Spanish-learning infants attend more to the highly salient audiovisual redundancy cues normally available in a talker's mouth than do monolingual infants. Presumably, greater attention to such cues renders the challenge of learning two languages easier. Spanish and Catalan are, however,…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Attention, Human Body, Infants
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Pyykkö, Juha; Forssman, Linda; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla; Leppänen, Jukka M. – Developmental Science, 2019
Eye tracking research has shown that infants develop a repertoire of attentional capacities during the first year. The majority of studies examining the early development of attention comes from Western, high-resource countries. We examined visual attention in a heterogeneous sample of infants in rural Malawi (N = 312-376, depending on analysis).…
Descriptors: Eye Movements, Infant Behavior, Attention, Rural Areas
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Wegener, Signy; Wang, Hua-Chen; Lissa, Peter; Robidoux, Serje; Nation, Kate; Castles, Anne – Developmental Science, 2018
There is an established association between children's oral vocabulary and their word reading but its basis is not well understood. Here, we present evidence from eye movements for a novel mechanism underlying this association. Two groups of 18 Grade 4 children received oral vocabulary training on one set of 16 novel words (e.g., 'nesh', 'coib'),…
Descriptors: Child Language, Oral Language, Vocabulary, Reading Skills
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