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Ferjan Ramírez, Naja; Lytle, Sarah Roseberry; Fish, Melanie; Kuhl, Patricia K. – Developmental Science, 2019
Previous studies reveal an association between particular features of parental language input and advances in children's language learning. However, it is not known whether parent coaching aimed to enhance specific input components would (a) successfully increase these components in parents' language input and (b) result in concurrent increases in…
Descriptors: Parents, Coaching (Performance), Randomized Controlled Trials, Child Language
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Wu, Jiamin; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H. – Developmental Science, 2019
We examined the developmental differences in motor control and learning of a two-segment movement. One hundred and five participants (53 female) were divided into three age groups (7-8 years, 9-10 years and 19-27 years). They performed a two-segment movement task in four conditions (full vision, fully disturbed vision, disturbed vision in the…
Descriptors: Motor Development, Elementary School Students, Task Analysis, Accuracy
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Rodriguez Buritica, Julia M.; Eppinger, Ben; Schuck, Nicolas W.; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Li, Shu-Chen – Developmental Science, 2016
Observational learning is an important mechanism for cognitive and social development. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying observational learning in children are not well understood. In this study, we used a probabilistic reward-based observational learning paradigm to compare behavioral and electrophysiological markers of…
Descriptors: Correlation, Children, Observational Learning, Reinforcement
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Hammer, Rubi; Kloet, Jim; Booth, James R. – Developmental Science, 2016
As children start attending school they are more likely to face situations where they have to autonomously learn about novel object categories (e.g. by reading a picture book with descriptions of novel animals). Such autonomous observational category learning (OCL) gradually complements interactive feedback-based category learning (FBCL), where a…
Descriptors: Developmental Stages, Adults, Observational Learning, Developmental Delays
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Kalish, Charles W.; Zhu, XiaoJin; Rogers, Timothy T. – Developmental Science, 2015
Psychological intuitions about natural category structure do not always correspond to the true structure of the world. The current study explores young children's responses to conflict between intuitive structure and authoritative feedback using a semi-supervised learning (Zhu et al., 2007) paradigm. In three experiments, 160 children between the…
Descriptors: Prior Learning, Child Development, Young Children, Intuition
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Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin; Linden, David E. J.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F. – Developmental Science, 2013
Adolescence is a period of profound change, which holds substantial developmental milestones, but also unique challenges to the individual. In this opinion paper, we highlight the potential of combining two recently developed behavioural and neural training techniques (cognitive bias modification and functional magnetic neuroimaging-based…
Descriptors: Adolescent Development, Adolescents, Brain, Behavior
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Euser, Anja S.; Evans, Brittany E.; Greaves-Lord, Kirstin; Huizink, Anja C.; Franken, Ingmar H. A. – Developmental Science, 2013
The present study examined the role of parental rearing behavior in adolescents' risky decision-making and the brain's feedback processing mechanisms. Healthy adolescent participants ("n" = 110) completed the EMBU-C, a self-report questionnaire on perceived parental rearing behaviors between 2006 and 2008 (T1). Subsequently, after an…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Parenting Styles, Child Rearing, Parent Influence
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Opfer, John E.; Martens, Marilee A. – Developmental Science, 2012
Experience engenders learning, but not all learning involves representational change. In this paper, we provide a dramatic case study of the distinction between learning and representational change. Specifically, we examined long- and short-term changes in representations of numeric magnitudes by asking individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and…
Descriptors: Children, Computation, Numbers, Change
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Lam, Christa; Kitamura, Christine – Developmental Science, 2012
Talkers hyperarticulate vowels when communicating with listeners that require increased speech intelligibility. Vowel hyperarticulation is said to be motivated by knowledge of the listener's linguistic needs because it typically occurs in speech to infants, foreigners and hearing-impaired listeners, but not to non-verbal pets. However, the degree…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Linguistic Competence, Cues, Intervention
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Koriat, Asher; Ackerman, Rakefet – Developmental Science, 2010
Research with adults indicates that confidence in the correctness of an answer decreases as a function of the amount of time it takes to reach that answer, suggesting that people use response latency as a mnemonic cue for subjective confidence. Experiment 1 extended investigation to 2nd, 3rd and 5th graders. When children chose the answer to…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Stimuli, Reaction Time, Grade 5
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Bulloch, Megan J.; Opfer, John E. – Developmental Science, 2009
Development of reasoning is often depicted as involving increasing use of relational similarities and decreasing use of perceptual similarities ("the perceptual-to-relational shift"). We argue that this shift is a special case of a broader developmental trend: increasing sensitivity to the predictive accuracy of different similarity types. To test…
Descriptors: Logical Thinking, Abstract Reasoning, Hypothesis Testing, Classification
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Leroux, Gaelle; Spiess, Jeanne; Zago, Laure; Rossi, Sandrine; Lubin, Amelie; Turbelin, Marie-Renee; Mazoyer, Bernard; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Houde, Olivier; Joliot, Marc – Developmental Science, 2009
A current issue in developmental science is that greater continuity in cognition between children and adults may exist than is usually appreciated in Piaget-like (stages or "staircase") models. This phenomenon has been demonstrated at the behavioural level, but never at the brain level. Here we show with functional magnetic resonance imaging…
Descriptors: Young Adults, Cognitive Development, Diagnostic Tests, Science Education
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Nielsen, Mark; Simcock, Gabrielle; Jenkins, Linda – Developmental Science, 2008
To date, developmental research has rarely addressed the notion that imitation serves an interpersonal, socially based function. The present research thus examined the role of social engagement on 24-month-olds' imitation by manipulating the social availability of the model. In Experiment 1, the children were more likely to imitate the exact…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Imitation, Social Influences, Interpersonal Relationship
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Perrucci, Vittore; Agnoli, Franca; Albiero, Paolo – Developmental Science, 2008
Studies of the development of mental rotation have yielded conflicting results, apparently because different mental rotation tasks draw on different cognitive abilities. Children may compare two stimuli at different orientations without mental rotation if the stimuli contain orientation-free features. Two groups of children (78 6-year-olds and 92…
Descriptors: Stimuli, Spatial Ability, Cognitive Ability, Reaction Time
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Killing, Sarah E. A.; Bishop, Dorothy V. M. – Developmental Science, 2008
Forty toddlers aged 20 to 24 months were presented with 32 pairs of images with the auditory stimulus Look followed by the name of the target image (e.g. "Look...tree") in an intermodal preferential looking (IPL) paradigm. The same series of 16 items was presented first with one image as target and then with the other member of the pair as target.…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Toddlers, Visual Stimuli, Individual Differences
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