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Peabody Picture Vocabulary…1
Showing 1 to 15 of 415 results Save | Export
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Allen, Jedediah W. P.; Bickhard, Mark H. – Cognitive Development, 2013
We would like to thank the commentators for their time and thoughtfulness--the commentaries are, in general, engaging and informative. Interestingly, most of the discussion has to do with the nature of representation, not with our basic critique of nativist infant research. Regarding the latter, there seems to be general agreement. Regarding…
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Interaction, Developmental Psychology, Research Methodology
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Allen, Jedediah W. P.; Bickhard, Mark H. – Cognitive Development, 2013
We argue that the nativist-empiricist debate in developmental psychology is distorted, both theoretically and methodologically, by a shared framework of assumptions concerning the nature of representation. In particular, both sides of the debate assume models of representation that make the emergence of representation impossible. This, in turn,…
Descriptors: Developmental Psychology, Cognitive Development, Experiments, Models
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Aschersleben, Gisa; Henning, Anne; Daum, Moritz M. – Cognitive Development, 2013
Research on early physical reasoning has shown surprising discontinuities in developmental trajectories. Infants possess some skills that seem to disappear and then re-emerge in childhood. It has been suggested that prediction skills required in search tasks might cause these discontinuities (Keen, 2003). We tested 3.5- to 5-year-olds'…
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Prediction, Preschool Children, Infants
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Jansen, P.; Schmelter, A.; Quaiser-Pohl, C.; Neuburger, S.; Heil, M. – Cognitive Development, 2013
In contrast to the well documented male advantage in psychometric mental rotation tests, gender differences in chronometric experimental designs are still under dispute. Therefore, a systematic investigation of gender differences in mental rotation performance in primary-school children is presented in this paper. A chronometric mental rotation…
Descriptors: Animals, Visual Stimuli, Pictorial Stimuli, Psychometrics
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Brandone, Amanda C.; Gelman, Susan A. – Cognitive Development, 2013
The goal of the present study was to explore domain differences in young children's expectations about the structure of animal and artifact categories. We examined 5-year-olds' and adults' use of category-referring generic noun phrases (e.g., "Birds fly") about novel animals and artifacts. The same stimuli served as both animals and artifacts;…
Descriptors: Animals, Language Usage, Language Acquisition, Cues
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Esseily, Rana; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; O'Regan, Kevin; Fagard, Jacqueline – Cognitive Development, 2013
Our aim was to investigate why 16-month-old infants fail to master a novel tool-use action via observational learning. We hypothesized that 16-month-olds' difficulties may be due to not understanding the goal of the observed action. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether showing infants an explicit demonstration of the goal of the action…
Descriptors: Infants, Observational Learning, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Hypothesis Testing
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Greenberg, Anastasia; Bellana, Buddhika; Bialystok, Ellen – Cognitive Development, 2013
Monolingual and bilingual 8-year-olds performed a computerized spatial perspective-taking task. Children were asked to decide how an observer saw a four-block array from one of three different positions (90 degrees, 180 degrees, and 270 degrees counter-clockwise from the child's position) by selecting one of four responses--the correct response,…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Monolingualism, Children, Executive Function
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Lee, Vivian; Kuhlmeier, Valerie A. – Cognitive Development, 2013
Studies of social cognitive reasoning have demonstrated instances of children engaging in eye gaze patterns toward correct answers even when pointing or verbal responses are directed toward incorrect answers. Findings such as these have spawned seminal theories, yet no consensus has been reached regarding the characteristics of the knowledge…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Social Cognition, Eye Movements, Nonverbal Communication
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Clerc, Jerome; Miller, Patricia H. – Cognitive Development, 2013
Three studies examined whether strategy utilization deficiencies emerge during transfer to two tasks that differ superficially from the main task but have the same underlying structural logic. In Experiment 1, children aged 4, 4 1/2, and 5 spontaneously produced selective attention strategies (or were prompted to do so) on a selective memory task.…
Descriptors: Memory, Attention, Transfer of Training, Learning Strategies
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Turati, Chiara; Gava, Lucia; Valenza, Eloisa; Ghirardi, Valentina – Cognitive Development, 2013
This study investigated processing of number and extent in newborns. Using visual preference, we showed that newborns discriminated between small sets of dot collections relying solely on implicit numerical information when non-numerical continuous variables were strictly controlled (Experiment 1), and solely on continuous information when…
Descriptors: Cognitive Processes, Attention, Neonates, Numbers
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Lahat, Ayelet; Helwig, Charles C.; Zelazo, Philip David – Cognitive Development, 2012
Moral and conventional violations are usually judged differently: Only moral violations are treated as independent of social rules. To investigate the cognitive processing involved in the development of this distinction, undergraduates (N = 34), adolescents (N = 34), and children (N = 14) read scenarios presented on a computer that had 1 of 3…
Descriptors: Adolescents, Age Differences, Cognitive Processes, Undergraduate Students
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Fletcher, Grace E.; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael – Cognitive Development, 2012
We compared the performance of 3- and 5-year-old children with that of chimpanzees in two tasks requiring collaboration via complementary roles. In both tasks, children and chimpanzees were able to coordinate two complementary roles with peers and solve the problem cooperatively. This is the first experimental demonstration of the coordination of…
Descriptors: Preschool Curriculum, Learning Activities, Cooperation, Cognitive Processes
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Recchia, Holly E.; Brehl, Beverly A.; Wainryb, Cecilia – Cognitive Development, 2012
The goal of this study was to investigate children's descriptions and evaluations of their reasons for leaving others out of a peer group. A total of 84 children (divided into 7-, 11-, and 17-year-old age groups) provided a narrative account of a time they excluded a peer and were subsequently asked to evaluate their reasons for exclusion. With…
Descriptors: Older Adults, Peer Groups, Cognitive Development, Moral Development
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Kondrad, Robyn L.; Jaswal, Vikram K. – Cognitive Development, 2012
Errors differ in degree of seriousness. We asked whether preschoolers would use the magnitude of an informant's errors to decide if that informant would be a good source of information later. Four- and 5-year-olds observed two informants incorrectly label familiar objects, but one informant's errors were closer to the correct answer than the…
Descriptors: Semantics, Novels, Language Acquisition, Semiotics
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Nguyen, Simone P.; Gelman, A. – Cognitive Development, 2012
Four studies examined the role of generic language in facilitating 4- and 5-year-old children's ability to cross-classify. Participants were asked to classify an item into a familiar (taxonomic or script) category, then cross-classify it into a novel (script or taxonomic) category with the help of a clue expressed in either generic or specific…
Descriptors: Classification, Generalization, Children, Experiments
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