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Showing 1 to 15 of 96 results Save | Export
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Mackenzie Swirbul; Gigliana Melzi – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
Young children's early math experiences are culturally situated, occurring in the context of everyday family interactions and routines. Yet, we know little about the math experiences in culturally and linguistically minoritized families, including those from Latine communities. In this article, we provide the first review of research on family…
Descriptors: Young Children, Hispanic Americans, Mathematics, Mathematics Instruction
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Lisa Horn; Márton Karsai; Gabriela Markova – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
Most children first enter social groups of peers in preschool. In this context, children use movement as a social tool, resulting in distinctive proximity patterns in space and synchrony with others over time. However, the social implications of children's movements with peers in space and time are difficult to determine due to the difficulty of…
Descriptors: Child Development, Social Development, Preschool Children, Peer Relationship
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Marianna Y. Zhang; J. Nicky Sullivan; Ellen M. Markman; Steven O. Roberts – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
Across development, young children reason about why social inequities exist. However, when left to their own devices, young children might engage in "internal thinking," reasoning that the inequity is simply a justified disparity explained by features internal to social groups (e.g., genetics, intellect, abilities, values). Internal…
Descriptors: Childrens Attitudes, Abstract Reasoning, Social Differences, Young Children
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Angelica Alonso; S. Alexa McDorman; Rachel R. Romeo – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
It is well established that parent-child dyadic synchrony (e.g., mutual emotions, behaviors) can support development across cognitive and socioemotional domains. The advent of simultaneous two-brain "hyperscanning" (i.e., measuring the brain activity of two individuals at the same time) allows further insight into dyadic "neural…
Descriptors: Parent Child Relationship, Brain Hemisphere Functions, Child Development, Nonverbal Communication
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Jessica A. Stern; Stephanie Irby Coard; Oscar A. Barbarin; Jude Cassidy – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
Within a sociohistorical context of racism-related physical and emotional threats, Black families in the United States have developed sources of resilience to promote children's safety and positive development. Yet research on Black family resilience has rarely been integrated into one of the most influential theories of child development:…
Descriptors: African American Family, Parent Child Relationship, Attachment Behavior, Caregiver Role
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Sally Hang; Geneva M. Jost; Amanda E. Guyer; Richard W. Robins; Paul D. Hastings; Camelia E. Hostinar – Child Development Perspectives, 2024
Loneliness becomes more prevalent as youth transition from childhood into adolescence. A key underlying process may be the puberty-related increase in biological stress reactivity, which can alter social behavior and elicit conflict or social withdrawal (fight-or-flight behaviors) in some youth, but increase prosocial (tend-and-befriend) responses…
Descriptors: Psychological Patterns, Puberty, Social Behavior, Models
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Xu, Ying – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Back-and-forth conversations with others are vital for children's development in the early years. While children's conversation partners have traditionally been their parents, teachers, and peers, recent advances in artificial intelligence have led to the introduction of machines that understand human speech and generate natural responses, and…
Descriptors: Artificial Intelligence, Man Machine Systems, Computer Mediated Communication, Educational Technology
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Martin Romero, Michelle Y.; Stein, Gabriela L. – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Vicarious exposure to discrimination can result in multiple negative outcomes in youth. In this article, we offer a conceptual model that articulates the intersecting contextual factors and potential moderators for U.S. Latine youth's exposure to family-level vicarious racism, and explore how that affects youth and family responses. We define and…
Descriptors: Hispanic Americans, Youth, Social Discrimination, Family (Sociological Unit)
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Diaz-Strong, Daysi Ximena; Gonzales, Roberto G. – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Undocumented immigrants arriving in the United States as minors navigate tremendous constraints as they transition into adolescence and adulthood. Exclusionary immigration laws profoundly shape and complicate the attainment of important milestones and the decisions undocumented minors make about their adult futures. A significant body of research,…
Descriptors: Undocumented Immigrants, Latin Americans, Migrants, Public Policy
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Shtulman, Andrew; Young, Andrew G. – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
What do cows drink? The correct answer is water, but many are tempted to say milk. The disposition to override an intuitive response (milk) with a more analytic response (water) is known as "cognitive reflection." Tests of cognitive reflection predict a wide range of skills and abilities in adults. In this article, we discuss the…
Descriptors: Child Development, Cognitive Development, Thinking Skills, Prediction
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Selcuk, Bilge; Gonultas, Secil; Ekerim-Akbulut, Muge – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Theory of mind (ToM) is a key social-cognitive skill that allows individuals to understand and attribute mental states to others; it facilitates relationships and helps individuals navigate the social world. Thus, it is likely influenced by social and cultural contexts. In this article, we review studies that examine the potential ways through…
Descriptors: Theory of Mind, Social Environment, Cultural Context, Social Cognition
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Laursen, Brett; Veenstra, René – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Peer influence is an instrument of change, with outcomes that are not preordained: The same processes that make influence a source of harm also make it a valuable interpersonal resource. Yet the benefits of peer influence are insufficiently appreciated. Knowing when and how much to conform to the wishes of others is an important skill that…
Descriptors: Children, Peer Influence, Social Behavior, Adjustment (to Environment)
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Casillas, Marisa – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
In this article, I advocate for an enriched view of children's linguistic input, with the aim of building sustainable and tangible links between theoretical models of language development and families' everyday experiences. Children's language experiences constrain theoretical models in ways that may illuminate universal learning biases. However,…
Descriptors: Child Language, Linguistic Input, Language Acquisition, Context Effect
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Ndijuye, Laurent Gabriel – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Research has consistently indicated that children of naturalized citizens from refugee backgrounds lag in most indicators of development. The disparities are more nuanced in contexts with limited educational resources, such as the sub-Saharan region of Africa. However, that is not the case with children of naturalized citizens from refugee…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Children, Refugees, Citizenship
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Lunkenheimer, Erika; Sturge-Apple, Melissa L.; Kelm, Madison R. – Child Development Perspectives, 2023
Parent self-regulation (PSR) is multifaceted, involving emotional, cognitive, and biological processes that support or constrain parenting behavior. It is highly relevant to disciplinary contexts in which parents' regulatory difficulties can contribute to harsh discipline, which is linked to children's maladjustment. In this article, we address…
Descriptors: Parents, Self Control, Self Management, Discipline
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