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Barber, Marlin – American Educational History Journal, 2018
When examining the efforts of African Americans to create and operate viable primary and secondary schools from 1865 to 1870 in Kentucky, it is difficult to not contemplate what potentially might have been had national support for the Black transition from enslavement to freedom not waned. W.E.B. Dubois and several subsequent historians concluded…
Descriptors: Slavery, African Americans, Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools
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Garry, Vanessa – American Educational History Journal, 2017
The discriminatory practices against African Americans during the Jim Crow era in St. Louis, Missouri did not deter Dr. Ruth Harris, the first African American female president of Stowe Teachers College (STC) in St. Louis, from accepting the challenge of leading the African American teachers' college from 1940 to 1954. Her appointment to President…
Descriptors: Preservice Teacher Education, African American Education, African American Teachers, African American Leadership
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Beyer, Kalani – American Educational History Journal, 2014
This chapter is a detailed investigation of education for Native Hawaiians during the 19th century. However, adhering to Ronald Takaki's assertion (2000) that it is important to demonstrate that America's racial policies involved common practices across culturally diverse groups, this paper incorporates prior studies on the education of African…
Descriptors: Hawaiians, American Indian Education, African American Education, United States History
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Davis, Donna M. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
At a time when most other institutions of higher education in the country excluded ex-slaves from admission, the University of Kansas conferred degrees upon sixty African Americans by 1910. However, while the university did allow ex-slaves to matriculate, these students still experienced a degree of exclusion and encountered barriers of racial…
Descriptors: Educational Experience, Slavery, African American Education, African American History
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Morowski, Deborah L. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
After the Civil War, schooling for African Americans was irregular and consisted mainly of elementary grades. Education was provided, primarily, by elite, private institutions and fewer than three percent of students aged 13-17 attended regularly. In 1896, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling in "Plessey v. Ferguson." Although…
Descriptors: Public Opinion, Hidden Curriculum, School Segregation, Court Litigation
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Ellis, Mark – American Educational History Journal, 2013
During the early 1920s, the question of who should control the schooling of African American children caused controversy in several Southern states, including Georgia. White educationists and bureaucrats were divided into two groups: the conservatives who called for educational needs to be determined and funded locally, and a growing reformist…
Descriptors: Race, Educational History, African American Students, School Buildings