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Miller, Nita Lewis; Shattuck, Lawrence G.; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Dyche, Jeff – Mind, Brain, and Education, 2008
This review examines the effects of military training regimes, which might include some degree of sleep deprivation, on sleep-wake schedules. We report a 4-year longitudinal study of sleep patterns of cadets at the United States Military Academy and the consequences of an extension of sleep from 6 to 8 hr per night at the United States Navy's…
Descriptors: Sleep, Military Training, Academic Achievement, Longitudinal Studies
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Luo, Rebekah; Harding, Rebecca; Galland, Barbara; Sellbom, Martin; Gill, Amelia; Schaughency, Elizabeth – Early Education and Development, 2019
Research Findings: Optimal sleep is important for children's learning and development. "Sleep disordered breathing" (SDB) refers to a spectrum of conditions from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnea that is common in childhood and interrupts sleep. We examined pathways between SDB and academic performance of children (N = 163, M…
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Young Children, Executive Function, Sleep
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Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche – Dimensions of Early Childhood, 2008
Many early childhood educators are faced with ever-increasing pressure by families, administrators, and policymakers to replace components of their programs deemed to be a waste of time, such as naptime or playtime, with what are considered to be more academic activities. A large body of literature supports the inclusion of play in an early…
Descriptors: Early Childhood Education, Young Children, Sleep, Correlation
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Scullin, Michael K. – Teaching of Psychology, 2019
Many students and educators know that sleep is important to learning, yet there exists a gap between their knowledge and behavior. For example, fewer than 10% of students sleep 8 hr before final exams. In the context of two undergraduate courses on sleep (N = 34), students could earn extra credit if they averaged =8.0 hr of sleep during final…
Descriptors: Sleep, Undergraduate Students, Tests, Course Descriptions
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Raja, A. Peter; Krishnamoorthy, K. – Shanlax International Journal of Education, 2018
Sleep is an important physiological process which is very much essential to lead a healthy life. Sleep was once considered an inactive, or passive, state in which both the body and the brain "turned off" to rest and recuperate from the day's waking activities. The quality of sleep determines the well being of an individual. Adequate…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Sleep, Adolescents, Physiology
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Cockcroft, K.; Grasko, D.; Fridjhon, P. – South African Journal of Higher Education, 2006
A factor that affects university students' academic performance is the quantity and quality of their sleep. There is a high rate of insomnia in the general population, but the prevalence of sleep difficulties among university students has not been extensively studied. The current study found that 23 per cent of the researched student population…
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Coping, Sleep, Questionnaires
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Becerra, Monideepa B.; Bol, Brittny S.; Granados, Rochelle; Hassija, Christina – Journal of American College Health, 2020
Sleep health is a public health concern and has been linked to an increased risk of number of deleterious health outcomes. Poor sleep health has been documented among college student populations; however, few studies have examined the social determinants of deficient sleep. The present study aims to address this gap, with emphasis on food…
Descriptors: Sleep, College Students, At Risk Students, Hunger
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Heissel, Jennifer; Norris, Samuel – Education Next, 2019
American teenagers are chronically sleep deprived. As children enter puberty, physiological changes delay the onset of sleep and make it more difficult to wake up early in the morning. By the end of middle school, there is a large disconnect between biological sleep patterns and early-morning school schedules: one study found that students lose as…
Descriptors: School Schedules, Sleep, Academic Achievement, Fatigue (Biology)
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Wheaton, Anne G.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B. – Journal of School Health, 2016
Background: Insufficient sleep in adolescents has been shown to be associated with a wide variety of adverse outcomes, from poor mental and physical health to behavioral problems and lower academic grades. However, most high school students do not get sufficient sleep. Delaying school start times for adolescents has been proposed as a policy…
Descriptors: Literature Reviews, Scheduling, Sleep, Student Behavior
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Perfect, Michelle M.; Smith, Bradley – International Journal of School & Educational Psychology, 2016
Sleep insufficiency, defined as inadequate sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness, has been linked with students' learning and behavioral outcomes at school. However, there is limited research on interventions designed to improve the sleep of school-age children. In order to promote more interest on this critical topic, we…
Descriptors: Hypnosis, Relaxation Training, Metacognition, Physical Activities
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Esbensen, A. J.; Hoffman, E. K. – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 2018
Background: Sleep problems have an impact on executive functioning in the general population. While children with Down syndrome (DS) are at high risk for sleep problems, the impact of these sleep problems on executive functioning in school-age children with DS is less well documented. Our study examined the relationship between parent-reported and…
Descriptors: Sleep, Executive Function, Down Syndrome, At Risk Students
Stewart, Sarah – Independent School, 2015
Two-thirds of high school students get less than eight to 10 hours of sleep per night according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Sleep deprivation in teens has been linked to poor academic performance, reduced immunity, obesity, ADD-like symptoms, and even drug and alcohol use. For years, experts have said that early school…
Descriptors: Private Schools, Sleep, High School Students, Child Health
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Reale, Laura; Guarnera, Manuela; Mazzone, Luigi – School Psychology International, 2014
Sleep disorders in children are common. Sleep plays an important role in children's development and sleep disorders can have a substantial impact on their quality of life. Indeed, sleep is crucial for physical growth, behavior, and emotional development and it is also closely related to cognitive functioning, learning and attention, and therefore…
Descriptors: Psychological Patterns, Sleep, Emotional Development, Physical Health
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Noland, Heather; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph; Telljohann, Susan K. – Journal of School Health, 2009
Background: Sleep duration affects the health of children and adolescents. Shorter sleep durations have been associated with poorer academic performance, unintentional injuries, and obesity in adolescents. This study extends our understanding of how adolescents perceive and deal with their sleep issues. Methods: General education classes were…
Descriptors: Sleep, Questionnaires, Special Health Problems, Adolescent Attitudes
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Dumuid, Dorothea; Olds, Timothy; Martín-Fernández, Josep-Antoni; Lewis, Lucy K.; Cassidy, Leah; Maher, Carol – Health Education & Behavior, 2017
Poor academic performance has been linked with particular lifestyle behaviors, such as unhealthy diet, short sleep duration, high screen time, and low physical activity. However, little is known about how lifestyle behavior patterns (or combinations of behaviors) contribute to children's academic performance. We aimed to compare academic…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Academic Achievement, Life Style, Multivariate Analysis
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