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da F. Passos, Maria de Lourdes R. – Behavior Analyst, 2012
Skinner's definition of verbal behavior, with its brief and refined versions, has recently become a point of controversy among behavior analysts. Some of the arguments presented in this controversy might be based on a misreading of Skinner's (1957a) writings. An examination of Skinner's correspondence with editors of scientific journals shows his…
Descriptors: Verbal Communication, Functional Behavioral Assessment, Behavioral Science Research, Definitions
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Matos, Maria Amelia; Passos, Maria de Lourdes – Behavior Analyst, 2010
The production of verbal operants not previously taught is an important aspect of language productivity. For Skinner, new mands, tacts, and autoclitics result from the recombination of verbal operants. The relation between these mands, tacts, and autoclitics is what linguists call "analogy," a grammatical pattern that serves as a foundation on…
Descriptors: Creativity, Verbal Stimuli, Grammar, Linguistics
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Dixon, Mark R.; Small, Stacey L.; Rosales, Rocio – Behavior Analyst, 2007
The present paper comments on and extends the citation analysis of verbal operant publications based on Skinner's "Verbal Behavior" (1957) by Dymond, O'Hora, Whelan, and O'Donovan (2006). Variations in population parameters were evaluated for only those studies that Dymond et al. categorized as empirical. Preliminary results indicate that the…
Descriptors: Verbal Communication, Citation Analysis, Verbal Operant Conditioning, Meta Analysis
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Dymond, S.; O'Hora, D.; Whelan, R.; O'Donovan, A. – Behavior Analyst, 2006
The present study undertook an updated citation analysis of Skinner's (1957) "Verbal Behavior". All articles that cited "Verbal Behavior" between 1984 and 2004 were recorded and content analyzed into one of five categories; four empirical and one nonempirical. Of the empirical categories, studies that employed a verbal operant from Skinner's…
Descriptors: Citation Analysis, Verbal Communication, Classification, Verbal Operant Conditioning
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Bondy, A.; Tincani, M.; Frost, L. – Behavior Analyst, 2004
This paper presents Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior as a framework for understanding language acquisition in children with autism. We describe Skinner's analysis of pure and impure verbal operants and illustrate how this analysis may be applied to the design of communication training programs. The picture exchange communication system…
Descriptors: Verbal Stimuli, Language Acquisition, Autism, Interpersonal Communication
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Schlinger, Henry D. – Behavior Analyst, 2008
As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the publication of B. F. Skinner's "Verbal Behavior", it may be important to reconsider the role of the listener in the verbal episode. Although by Skinner's own admission, "Verbal Behavior" was primarily about the behavior of the speaker, his definition of verbal behavior as "behavior reinforced through the…
Descriptors: Listening, Verbal Communication, Behavior, Inner Speech (Subvocal)
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McKerchar, Todd L.; Morris, Edward K.; Smith, Nathaniel G. – Behavior Analyst, 2011
This paper describes and analyzes B. F. Skinner's coauthoring practices. After identifying his 35 coauthored publications and 27 coauthors, we analyze his coauthored works by their form (e.g., journal articles) and kind (e.g., empirical); identify the journals in which he published and their type (e.g., data-type); describe his overall and local…
Descriptors: Journal Articles, Authors, Publications, Writing for Publication
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Moore, J. – Behavior Analyst, 2010
Following from an earlier analysis by B. F. Skinner, the present article suggests that the verbal processes in science may usefully be viewed as following a three-stage progression. This progression starts with (a) identification of basic data, then moves to (b) description of relations among those data, and ultimately concludes with (c) the…
Descriptors: Identification (Psychology), Science Activities, Behaviorism, Pragmatics