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ERIC Number: EJ1124075
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016-Dec
Pages: 11
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1092-4388
Estimating Subglottal Pressure from Neck-Surface Acceleration during Normal Voice Production
Fryd, Amanda S.; Van Stan, Jarrad H.; Hillman, Robert E.; Mehta, Daryush D.
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, v59 n6 p1335-1345 Dec 2016
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for estimating subglottal air pressure using a neck-surface accelerometer and to compare the accuracy of predicting subglottal air pressure relative to predicting acoustic sound pressure level (SPL). Method: Indirect estimates of subglottal pressure (P[subscript sg]') were obtained from 10 vocally healthy speakers during loud-to-soft repetitions of 3 different /p/-vowel gestures (/pa/, /pi/, /pu/) at 3 pitch levels in the modal register. Intraoral air pressure, neck-surface acceleration, and radiated acoustic pressure were recorded, and the root-mean-square amplitude of the acceleration signal was correlated with P[subscript sg'] and SPL. Results: The coefficient of determination between accelerometer level and P[subscript sg]' was high when data were pooled from all vowel and pitch contexts for each participant (r[superscript 2] = 0.68-0.93). These relationships were stronger than corresponding relationships between accelerometer level and SPL (r[superscript 2] = 0.46-0.81). The average 95% prediction interval for estimating P[subscript sg'] using accelerometer level was ±2.53 cm H[subscript 2]O[subscript 1] ranging from ±1.70 to ±3.74 cm H[subscript 2]O across participants. Conclusions: Accelerometer signal amplitude correlated more strongly with P[subscript sg'] than with SPL. Future work is warranted to investigate the robustness of the relationship in nonmodal voice qualities, individuals with voice disorders, and accelerometer-based ambulatory monitoring of subglottal pressure.
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. 2200 Research Blvd #250, Rockville, MD 20850. Tel: 301-296-5700; Fax: 301-296-8580; e-mail: slhr@asha.org; Web site: http://jslhr.pubs.asha.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Authoring Institution: N/A
Grant or Contract Numbers: R33DC011588