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ERIC Number: EJ1115986
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016-Aug
Pages: 14
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0090-6905
Reading Processes and Parenting Styles
Carreteiro, Rui Manuel; Justo, João Manuel; Figueira, Ana Paula
Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, v45 n4 p901-914 Aug 2016
Home literacy environment explains between 12 and 18.5% of the variance of children's language skills. Although most authors agree that children whose parents encourage them to read tend to develop better and earlier reading skills, some authors consider that the impact of family environment in reading skills is overvalued. Probably, other variables of parent-child relationship, like parenting styles, might be relevant for this field. Nevertheless, no previous studies on the effect of parenting styles in literacy have been found. To analyze the role of parenting styles in the reading processes of children. Children's perceptions of parenting styles contribute significantly to the explanation of statistical variance of children's reading processes. 110 children (67 boys and 43 girls), aged between 7 and 11 years (M = 9.22 and SD = 1.14) from Portuguese schools answered to a socio-demographic questionnaire. To assess reading processes it was administered the Portuguese adaptation (Figueira et al. in press) of "Bateria de Avaliação dos Processos Leitores-Revista" (PROLEC-R). To assess the parenting styles "Egna Minnen av Barndoms Uppfostran"-parents (EMBU-P) and EMBU-C (children version) were administered. According to multiple hierarchical linear regressions, individual factors contribute to explain all reading tests of PROLEC-R, while family factors contribute to explain most of these tests. Regarding parenting styles, results evidence the explanatory power about grammatical structures, sentence comprehension and listening. Parenting styles have an important role in the explanation of higher reading processes (syntactic and semantic) but not in lexical processes, focused by main theories concerning dyslexia.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Portugal