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Stevanovic, Melisa; Kuusisto, Arniika – Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 2019
Identifying precisely what teachers do to elicit desired changes in their students' knowledge and skill is a long-lasting challenge of educational research. Here, we use conversation analysis to contribute to a deeper understanding of this matter by considering how Finnish-speaking musical instrument teachers use directives to guide their…
Descriptors: Music Education, Musical Instruments, Music Teachers, Teaching Methods
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Taylor, Angela; Hallam, Susan – Music Education Research, 2008
Although many adults take up or return to instrumental and vocal tuition every year, we know very little about how they experience it. As part of ongoing case study research, eight older learners with modest keyboard skills explored what their musical skills meant to them during conversation-based repertory grid interviews. The data were…
Descriptors: Music Education, Musical Instruments, Educational Research, Adults
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Hallam, Susan – Psychology of Music, 2013
Research exploring learning outcomes in instrumental music has tended to focus on attainment ignoring other outcomes including long-term commitment to engage with music. This research addresses this issue. One hundred and sixty-three instrumental music students completed a questionnaire which sought information about their practising strategies,…
Descriptors: Music, Music Education, Expertise, Outcomes of Education
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Denis, John M. – Contributions to Music Education, 2019
The purpose of this study was to describe novice band directors' perceptions of (a) the importance of skills/knowledge competencies, (b) the difficulty of acquiring skills/knowledge competencies, (c) differences between teaching competency importance and acquisition ratings, (d) benefits of university coursework, and (e) potential improvements to…
Descriptors: Music Teachers, Beginning Teachers, Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Teacher Attitudes
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Walter, Donald J.; Walter, Jennifer S. – Music Educators Journal, 2015
Practice is a major element in cultivating musical skill. Some psychologists have proposed that deliberate practice, a specific framework for structuring practice activities, creates the kind of practice necessary to increase skill and develop expertise. While psychologists have been observing behavior, neurologists have studied how the brain…
Descriptors: Music Education, Brain, Teaching Methods, Research
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West, Chad – Music Educators Journal, 2015
Early in my teaching career, my goals were to teach students to play their instruments beautifully and to help them correctly and independently interpret music notation. However, many of my students were missing the internal musicianship skills that enable high-level music-making. As we teach instrument technique and notation, we sometimes…
Descriptors: Music Education, Musical Instruments, Music Theory, Creativity
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Taylor, Angela – British Journal of Music Education, 2012
Repertory grids were used as a research tool to explore 73-year-old James' musical development over two years. Choosing two music learning cultures for his instrumental learning, James learned the piano in a college workshop and the Appalachian dulcimer in his local folk group. There were clear changes in his musical skills and attitudes,…
Descriptors: Music Education, Music, Musicians, Males
Rawlins, Robert – Teaching Music, 2004
In this article, the author argues that in many ways, developing instrumental practice techniques is an experiment with a sample of one. Musicians must learn which methods work best for them as individuals. This starts in the earliest stages of learning a musical instrument. Teachers offer suggestions: students discover how others are practicing,…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Musicians, Music Education, Musical Instruments
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Martin, Jeffrey – General Music Today, 2012
Instrumental performance that approximates real-world models is one way in which a general music curriculum can encourage high levels of engagement and potential for lifelong musical activity. Although guitars, keyboards, and various folk instruments are useful for this purpose, orchestral instruments can also provide significant solo and ensemble…
Descriptors: Music Education, Music, Learning Experience, Musical Instruments
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Brook, Julia; Upitis, Rena; Varela, Wynnpaul – British Journal of Music Education, 2017
The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding of how one classically trained musician adapted his pedagogical practices to accommodate the needs and interests of his students. A case-study methodology was employed to explore the perceptions and practices of this teacher, and data were collected over a two-year period through…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Musical Instruments, Case Studies, Teacher Attitudes
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Chen-Hafteck, Lily; Schraer-Joiner, Lyn – Music Education Research, 2011
This multiple case study examined the musical experiences of five hard-of-hearing/deaf children (hearing loss ranging from 35-95 dB) and four typical-hearing children, ages 3-4. Their responses to various musical activities were observed and analysed using flow indicators. It was found that both groups of children: (1) were capable of engaging in…
Descriptors: Music Education, Individual Characteristics, Music, Music Activities
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Montgomery, Janet; Martinson, Amy – Music Educators Journal, 2006
Physical skills, such as fine and gross motor skills, are necessary for students to play musical instruments. Cognitive skills are necessary for students to comprehend music concepts. Emotional and social skills are necessary for students to participate in musical ensembles and general music classes. Attention to these extramusical goals in music…
Descriptors: Musical Instruments, Music Therapy, Music Teachers, Music Education
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Simones, Lilian; Rodger, Matthew; Schroeder, Franziska – Cognition and Instruction, 2017
This study centers upon a piano learning and teaching environment in which beginners and intermediate piano students (N = 48) learning to perform a specific type of staccato were submitted to three different (group-exclusive) teaching conditions: "audio-only" demonstration of the musical task; observation of the teacher's action…
Descriptors: Musical Instruments, Music Education, Teaching Methods, Observation
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Latten, James E. – Music Educators Journal, 2001
Discusses why students who play musical instruments should participate in a chamber music ensemble. Provides rationale for using small ensembles in the high school band curriculum. Focuses on the topic of scheduling, illustrating how to insert small ensembles into the lesson schedule, and how to set up a new schedule. (CMK)
Descriptors: Bands (Music), Educational Benefits, High Schools, Music
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Tan, Leonard – Contributions to Music Education, 2017
Practice, skill and competition are important aspects of participating in school bands and orchestras. However, writers have questioned their value. In this philosophical paper, I mine the writings of the American pragmatists--in particular, their theories of habit and experience--to construct a theory of action for instrumental music education,…
Descriptors: Competition, Music Techniques, Music, Music Education
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