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ERIC Number: EJ844955
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2005
Pages: 6
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 28
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1931-6569
Putting a Frame on Leadership
Dexter, Robin R.; Berube, William B.; Perry, Suzanne M.; Stader, David L.
AASA Journal of Scholarship & Practice, v2 n3 p16-21 Fall 2005
Teachers are learning more about the theories that support conceptual frameworks as a learning tool. A literature review revealed that frame theory is an accepted principle used to describe how the brain organizes experiences and new information. Frame theory supports the understanding that individuals can organize their thoughts to better understand new concepts and beliefs into a memory structure called a frame. A frame allows users to locate, perceive, identify, and label a seemingly infinite number of concrete experiences (Goffman, 1974; Minsky, 1986). The frame helps the brain identify what would otherwise be meaningless knowledge into something meaningful for use in the future. The Leadership Matrix used in the educational leadership program at the University of Wyoming combines knowledge from the literature and research theory to provide students with a support structure to help them organize their new knowledge and beliefs in the area of educational leadership. David Perkins (1986) supported the assumption that a frame does not define in advance the answer but that it is up to the learner to fill in the content of a frame through assimilation of experiences. No one strategy, technique, or method will always work to support the thinking process but the Leadership Matrix provides principal candidates with a structure to support organization of their new knowledge and beliefs. Two initial informal survey studies have produced positive findings related to the students' perception of the Leadership Matrix as a tool to support learning. The Leadership Matrix can be continuously refined and adjusted as school leaders progress through their preparation programs and careers. Although initial findings support the use of the Leadership Matrix in principal preparation programs, the value and effectiveness of the Leadership Matrix for prospective principals continues to be a work in progress. (Contains 1 table.)
American Association of School Administrators. 801 North Quincy Street Suite 700, Arlington, VA 22203-1730. Tel: 703-528-0700; Fax: 703-841-1543; e-mail: info@aasa.org; Web site: http://www.aasa.org/publications/jsp.cfm
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Wyoming