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ERIC Number: ED576752
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2017
Pages: 162
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: 978-1-3697-4754-6
ISSN: EISSN-
African-American Academic Nurse Leader's Role in Persistence of African-American Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Nelson, Kesha Marie
ProQuest LLC, N.P. Dissertation, University of Phoenix
African-American baccalaureate nursing students have a limited persistence to graduation. This constructivist grounded theory study was designed to generate a substantive theory, emerged from these data, that explained and provided insight the African-American academic nurse leader's role in the persistence to graduation of African-American baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students. Telephone interviews were the primary source of data collection as the research participants were African-American BSN program leaders (deans, assistant deans, department chairpersons, or directors) located in various regions throughout the United States. The research question that guided this study (RQ 1) was: What is the African-American academic nurse leader's role in the persistence to graduation of African-American BSN students? Analysis of these data included simultaneous comparative method process of data collection and analysis, data coding (open, axial, and selective), memo writing, and sampling to refine theoretical ideas and integration of the theoretical framework. Upon completion of the participant interviews of the African-American academic nurse leaders, a second research question developed. RQ2: What substantive theory emerged from these data that explained and provided insight into the African-American academic nurse leader's role in the persistence to graduation of African-American BSN students? The substantive theory that emerged from these data was as follows: The African-American academic nurse leader facilitates an interactive system managing the curriculum and securing resources while capitalizing on African-American students' personal attributes. The African-American academic nurse leader empowers faculty and students through the development of an inclusive culture to reduce barriers. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A