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Davies, Gary B. – Physics Education, 2017
Carrying out classroom experiments that demonstrate Boyle's law and Gay-Lussac's law can be challenging. Even if we are able to conduct classroom experiments using pressure gauges and syringes, the results of these experiments do little to illuminate the kinetic theory of gases. However, molecular dynamics simulations that run on computers allow…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Science Experiments, Physics, Educational Technology
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Ladino, L. A.; Rondón, S. H. – Physics Education, 2015
In this paper, we present a low-cost method to study the Gay-Lussac's law. We use a heating wire wrapped around the test tube to heat the air inside and make use of a solid state pressure sensor which requires a previous calibration to measure the pressure in the test tube.
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Science Experiments, Scientific Concepts, Heat
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Oliveira, F. S.; Calheiro, L. B.; Bozano, D. F.; Errobidart, N. C. G.; Jardim, M. I. A.; Reis, D. D.; Goncalves, A. M. B. – Physics Education, 2019
We present an Arduino approach to collect pressure and temperature data from electronic sensors. Using a constant volume-metal-vessel immersed in a water bath and changing its temperature, we measure the pressure as a function of the temperature inside the vessel. With this apparatus, it is possible to demonstrate Gay-Lussac's law. Based on…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Data Collection, Measurement Equipment
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Kilmer, Nelson; Krehbiel, Joel D. – Physics Teacher, 2019
Gay-Lussac's law states that the pressure of an ideal gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature if the volume is constant. Students observe this relationship by taking measurements on the pressure of gas in a flask or metal sphere at different temperatures and then extrapolate the data to estimate absolute zero. In our college…
Descriptors: Physics, Science Instruction, Science Experiments, Teaching Methods
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Askew, Jennifer; Gray, Ron – Science Teacher, 2016
British scientist John Dalton (1766-1844), French scientist Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778-1850), and Italian scientist Amedeo Avogadro (1776-1856) are familiar to many chemistry students. Such students may understand the importance of Dalton's atomic theory, model how Gay-Lussac's law relates the pressure and the temperature of a gas, and use…
Descriptors: Science Instruction, Chemistry, Molecular Structure, Scientific Concepts
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Criswell, Brett – Journal of Chemical Education, 2008
Within the historical context of the development of chemistry, Avogadro's hypothesis represents a fundamental concept: It allowed Avogadro to explain Gay-Lussac's law of combining volumes and it allowed Cannizzaro to establish a more accurate set of atomic mass values. If students are going to understand the concept of relative atomic masses and…
Descriptors: Fundamental Concepts, Chemistry, Science Instruction, Scientific Concepts
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Gilbert, George L. – Journal of Chemical Education, 1983
An apparatus is described in which effects of pressure, volume, and temperature changes on a gas can be observed simultaneously. Includes use of the apparatus in demonstrating Boyle's, Gay-Lussac's, and Charles' Laws, attractive forces, Dalton's Law of Partial pressures, and in illustrating measurable vapor pressures of liquids and some solids.…
Descriptors: Chemistry, College Science, Demonstrations (Educational), Higher Education
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Wiebe, Rick; Stinner, Arthur – Interchange: A Quarterly Review of Education, 2010
Students tend to have a poor understanding of the concept of gas pressure. Usually, gas pressure is taught in terms of the various formulaic gas laws. The development of the concept of gas pressure according to the early Greeks did not include the concept of a vacuum. It was not for another 2000 years that Torricelli proposed that a vacuum can…
Descriptors: Scientific Principles, Chemistry, Evaluation Methods, Scientific Concepts