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Amsler, Sarah; Motta, Sara C. – Gender and Education, 2019
In this paper, we offer a critique of neoliberal power from the perspective of the gendered, sexualised, raced and classed politics of motherhood in English universities. By using dialogical auto-ethnographic methods to examine our own past experiences as full-time employed mother-academics, we demonstrate how feminist academic praxis can not only…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Universities, Commercialization, Politics of Education
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Gray, Emily M.; Nicholas, Lucy – British Journal of Sociology of Education, 2019
In 2016 the world witnessed a consolidation of a western brand of political 'populist authoritarianism' that is anti-globalisationalist and creates 'shared objects of loathing' in the popular imagination. This article engages with the implications of this affective and masculinist 'post-truth' era for higher education and analyses the narratives…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Masculinity, Social Theories, Gender Issues
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Michell, Dee; Szorenyi, Anna; Falkner, Katrina; Szabo, Claudia – Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 2017
Computer science, like technology in general, is seen as a masculine field and the under-representation of women an intransigent problem. In this paper, we argue that the cultural belief in Australia that computer science is a domain for men results in many girls and women being chased away from that field as part of a border protection campaign…
Descriptors: Computer Science Education, Gender Differences, Females, Foreign Countries
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Fraser, Heather; Michell, Dee; Beddoe, Liz; Jarldorn, Michele – Higher Education Research and Development, 2016
In this article, we report on a feminist memory work project conducted with 11 working-class women in Australia. Participants responded to the question: "what helps and hinders working-class women study social science degrees?" The women confirmed that to succeed at university, they needed opportunities, resources, support and…
Descriptors: Working Class, Females, Higher Education, Social Sciences