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Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G. – Journal of Human Resources, 2010
This paper uses Norwegian data to estimate the effect of family size on IQ scores of men. Instrumental variables (IV) estimates using sex composition as an instrument show no significant negative effect of family size; however, IV estimates using twins imply that family size has a negative effect on IQ scores. Our results suggest that the effect…
Descriptors: Family Size, Intelligence Quotient, Males, Family Structure
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Ponczek, Vladimir; Souza, Andre Portela – Journal of Human Resources, 2012
This paper presents new evidence of the causal effect of family size on child quality in a developing-country context. We estimate the impact of family size on child labor and educational outcomes among Brazilian children and young adults by exploring the exogenous variation of family size driven by the presence of twins in the family. Using the…
Descriptors: Females, Family Size, Males, Human Capital
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Aguero, Jorge M.; Marks, Mindy S. – Journal of Human Resources, 2011
We introduce a new instrument for family size, infertility, to investigate the causal relationship between children and female labor force participation. Infertility mimics an experiment where nature assigns an upper bound for family size, independent of a woman's background. This new instrument allows us to investigate the differential labor…
Descriptors: Mothers, Employed Women, Labor Supply, Developing Nations
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Caceres-Delpiano, Julio – Journal of Human Resources, 2006
Using multiple births as an exogenous shift in family size, I investigate the impact of the number of children on child investment and child well-being. Using data from the 1980 US Census Five-Percent Public Use Micro Sample, 2SLS results demonstrate that parents facing a change in family size reallocate resources in a way consistent with Becker's…
Descriptors: Private Schools, Labor Force Nonparticipants, Labor Force, Grade Repetition
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Kantarevic, Jasmin; Mechoulan, Stephane – Journal of Human Resources, 2006
We examine the implications of being early in the birth order, and whether a pattern exists within large families of falling then rising attainment with respect to birth order. Unlike other studies using U.S. data, we go beyond grade for age and look at racial differences. Drawing from OLS and fixed effects estimations, we find that being…
Descriptors: Racial Differences, Educational Attainment, Birth Order, African Americans
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Baumol, William J. – Journal of Human Resources, 1974
The consumption effects, health, social activities, and family size of families eligible for or receiving subsidies such as negative income tax (Graduated Work Incentive Experiment-New Jersey, Pennsylvania) did not change significantly; however, the support program apparently produced an improvement in housing standards and an increase in home…
Descriptors: Consumer Economics, Family Structure, Federal Aid, Health
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Parish, William L.; Willis, Robert J. – Journal of Human Resources, 1993
Data from Taiwanese cohorts show that parental investment in children is affected by credit constraints; early-born children do poorly, especially females; in poorer families and older cohorts, older sisters increase younger siblings' education; and in younger cohorts and richer families, effects of family size and gender composition are weaker.…
Descriptors: Birth Order, Credit (Finance), Daughters, Educational Attainment
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Hill, M. Anne; O'Neill, June – Journal of Human Resources, 1994
Children's scores on the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test were influenced by mothers' schooling, grandparents' schooling, and family size. Increases in mothers' working hours negatively affected children's achievement. Welfare dependence reduced test scores, largely due to transmission of an underclass heritage of low achievement. (Author/SK)
Descriptors: Cognitive Ability, Cognitive Development, Educational Attitudes, Employed Women
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Akresh, Richard – Journal of Human Resources, 2009
Using data I collected in Africa, this paper examines a household's decision to adjust its size through child fostering, an institution where biological parents temporarily send children to live with other families. Households experiencing negative idiosyncratic income shocks, child gender imbalances, located further from primary schools, or with…
Descriptors: Family Income, Parents, Foreign Countries, Gender Issues
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Bloch, Francis; Rao, Vijayandra; Desai, Sonalde – Journal of Human Resources, 2004
The determinants of expenditures on wedding celebrations by rural Indian families are examined. A status signaling model of wedding celebrations is developed where the size of the celebration signals the quality of the new groom's family and the enhanced social status of the bride's family.
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Social Status, Ceremonies, Marriage
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Conley, Dalton; Glauber, Rebecca – Journal of Human Resources, 2006
This study uses exogenous variation in sibling sex composition to estimate the causal effect of sibship size on boys' probabilities of private school attendance and grade retention. Using the 1990 U.S. Census, we find that for second-born boys, increased sibship size reduces the likelihood of private school attendance by six percentage points and…
Descriptors: School Holding Power, Race, Probability, Males
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Taylor, Beck A.; Dearing, Eric; McCartney, Kathleen – Journal of Human Resources, 2004
The impact of family economic resources on developmental outcomes in early childhood is examined. Relative income effect sizes were found to have practical significance, both within the sample and compared to participation in Early Head Start.
Descriptors: Effect Size, Family Financial Resources, Young Children, Family Income
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Aaronson, Daniel; Mazumder, Bhashkar – Journal of Human Resources, 2008
We estimate trends in intergenerational economic mobility by matching men in the Census to synthetic parents in the prior generation. We find that mobility increased from 1950 to 1980 but has declined sharply since 1980. While our estimator places greater weight on location effects than the standard intergenerational coefficient, the size of the…
Descriptors: Trend Analysis, Occupational Mobility, Economic Research, Economic Status
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Francesconi, Marco; van der Klaauw, Wilbert – Journal of Human Resources, 2007
In October 1999, the British government enacted the Working Families' Tax Credit, which aimed at encouraging work among low-income families with children. This paper uses panel data collected between 1991 and 2001 to evaluate the effect of this reform on single mothers. We find that the reform led to a substantial increase in their employment rate…
Descriptors: Tax Credits, Mothers, Low Income, Low Income Groups
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Aughinbaugh, Alison; Gittleman, Maury – Journal of Human Resources, 2003
In this paper, we examine the effect of income on child development in the United States and the United Kingdom, as measured by scores on cognitive, behavioral, and social assessments. In line with previous results for the United States, we find that for both countries income generally has an effect on child development that is positive and…
Descriptors: Family Income, Family Characteristics, Foreign Countries, Child Development
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