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Nadeem, Erum; Waterman, Jill; Foster, Jared; Paczkowski, Emilie; Belin, Thomas R.; Miranda, Jeanne – Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 2017
This exploratory longitudinal study examined behavioral outcomes and parenting stress among families with children adopted from foster care, taking into account environmental and biological risk factors. Child internalizing and externalizing problems and parenting stress were assessed in 82 adopted children and their families at 2 months…
Descriptors: At Risk Persons, Mental Health, Psychological Patterns, Child Rearing
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Tirella, Linda G.; Tickle-Degnen, Linda; Miller, Laurie C.; Bedell, Gary – Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 2012
The purpose of this study was to describe reflections of nine American parents on the strengths, challenges, and strategies in parenting young children newly adopted from another country. Eight mothers and one father with an adopted child aged less than 3 years and home for less than 3 months completed standardized assessments measuring the…
Descriptors: Parent Child Relationship, Adoption, Community Resources, Child Rearing
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Farr, Rachel H. – Developmental Psychology, 2017
Controversy continues to surround parenting by lesbian and gay (LG) adults and outcomes for their children. As sexual minority parents increasingly adopt children, longitudinal research about child development, parenting, and family relationships is crucial for informing such debates. In the psychological literature, family systems theory contends…
Descriptors: Sexual Orientation, Parents, Longitudinal Studies, Adoption
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Mainemer, Henry; Gilman, Lorraine C.; Ames, Elinor W. – Journal of Family Issues, 1998
Parenting stress was found to be greater in families that adopted children who had been institutionalized for eight months or more in a Romanian orphanage than those in two comparison groups. Aspects of child behavior and family factors which contributed to stress, and implications for special needs adoptions are discussed. (Author/EMK)
Descriptors: Adopted Children, Adoptive Parents, Behavior Problems, Family Characteristics