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ERIC Number: EJ948385
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2011-Dec
Pages: 15
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0890-8567
Differential Patterns of Abnormal Activity and Connectivity in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Circuitry in Bipolar-I and Bipolar-NOS Youth
Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Farchione, Tiffany; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Pruitt, Patrick; Radwan, Jacqueline; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.
Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, v50 n12 p1275-1289.e2 Dec 2011
Objective: The functioning of neural systems supporting emotion processing and regulation in youth with bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) remains poorly understood. We sought to examine patterns of activity and connectivity in youth with BP-NOS relative to youth with bipolar disorder type I (BP-I) and healthy controls (HC). Method: Participants (18 BP-I youth, 16 BP-NOS youth, and 18 HC) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing two emotional-face gender labeling tasks (happy/neutral, fearful/neutral). Analyses focused on a priori neural regions supporting emotion processing (amygdala) and emotion regulation (ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC)), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Connectivity analyses used VMPFC as a seed region. Results: During the happy-face task, BP-I youth had greater amygdala, VMPFC, and DLPFC activity to happy faces whereas BP-NOS youth had reduced VMPFC and DLPFC activity to neutral faces relative to HC, and reduced amygdala, VMPFC, and DLPFC activity to neutral faces versus BP-I. During the fearful-face task, BP-I youth had reduced DLPFC activity to fearful faces whereas BP-NOS youth had reduced DLPFC activity to neutral faces relative to HC. BP-NOS youth showed greater VMPFC-DLPFC connectivity to happy faces relative to HC and BP-I youth. BP-I youth showed reduced VMPFC-amygdala connectivity to fearful faces relative to HC and BP-NOS youth. Conclusions: This is the first study to document differential patterns of abnormal neural activity in, and connectivity between, neural regions supporting emotion processing and regulation in BP-NOS versus BP-I youth. Findings suggest that despite similarities in symptom presentation, there are differential patterns of abnormal neural functioning in BP-NOS and BP-I relative to HC, which might reflect an "intermediate state" in the course of BP-I illness. Future longitudinal studies are needed to relate these findings with future conversion to BP-I/II. (Contains 3 figures and 4 tables.)
Elsevier. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. Tel: 877-839-7126; Tel: 407-345-4020; Fax: 407-363-1354; e-mail: usjcs@elsevier.com; Web site: http://www.elsevier.com
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A