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ERIC Number: EJ1147814
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2016
Pages: 12
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1029-8457
The Sequencing of Basic Chemistry Topics by Physical Science Teachers
Sibanda, Doras; Hobden, Paul
African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, v20 n2 p142-153 2016
The purpose of this study was to find out teachers' preferred teaching sequence for basic chemistry topics in Physical Science in South Africa, to obtain their reasons underpinning their preferred sequence, and to compare these sequences with the prescribed sequences in the current curriculum. The study was located within a pragmatic paradigm and employed a multi-level learning model as an interpretive framework. A mixed-methods research design was used and survey data collected from a convenience sample of 227 physical science teachers and follow-up interviews with a subset of 11 experienced teachers. Analysis of the data revealed that in general 70% of teachers preferred sequences starting with microscopic-level knowledge such as atoms and molecules, while only 30% preferred starting with macroscopic-level knowledge topics such as solids, liquids and gases. Five main categories of reason were given by teachers. The majority of teachers' reasons focused on general learning principles such as moving from simple to complex or linking to prior knowledge as opposed to focusing on the specific needs and demands of chemistry knowledge. In addition, it was found that the new Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement was based on starting with macroscopic-level topics which indicates a potential conflict between teachers' preferred sequences and those required by the current curriculum.
Routledge. Available from: Taylor & Francis, Ltd. 530 Walnut Street Suite 850, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Tel: 800-354-1420; Tel: 215-625-8900; Fax: 215-207-0050; Web site: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Secondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: South Africa