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Levy, Yonata; Eilam, Ariela – Journal of Child Language, 2013
This is a naturalistic study of the development of language in Hebrew-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with Down syndrome (DS), whose MLU extended from 1[multiplied by]0 to 4[multiplied by]4. Developmental curves over the entire span of data collection revealed minor differences between children with WS, children with DS,…
Descriptors: Child Language, Language Acquisition, Down Syndrome, Genetic Disorders
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Phillips, Kristin D.; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P. – Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2009
The refinement of the Williams syndrome phenotype has frequently included the study of behavioral and temperamental features common to individuals with this disorder. Within this line of research, the importance of evaluating incidence of psychopathology has been increasingly recognized, with studies consistently identifying an increased risk for…
Descriptors: Mental Retardation, Mental Health, Psychopathology, Symptoms (Individual Disorders)
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Van Den Heuvel, E.; Manders, E.; Swillen, A.; Zink, I. – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 2016
Background: This study aimed to compare developmental courses of structural and pragmatic language skills in school-aged children with Williams syndrome (WS) and children with idiopathic intellectual disability (IID). Comparison of these language trajectories could highlight syndrome-specific developmental features. Method: Twelve monolingual…
Descriptors: Genetic Disorders, Language Skills, Children, Intellectual Disability
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Godbee, Kali; Porter, Melanie A. – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2013
People with Williams syndrome (WS) are said to have sociable and extremely trusting personalities, approaching strangers without hesitation. This study investigated whether people with WS are less likely than controls to attribute negative intent to others when interpreting a series of ambiguous pictures. This may, at least partially, explain…
Descriptors: Intention, Genetic Disorders, Mental Retardation, Mental Age
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Farran, E. K.; Formby, S.; Daniyal, F.; Holmes, T.; Van Herwegen, J. – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 2016
Background: Successful navigation is crucial to everyday life. Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) have impaired spatial abilities. This includes a deficit in spatial navigation abilities such as learning the route from A to B. To-date, to determine whether participants attend to landmarks when learning a route, landmark recall tasks have been…
Descriptors: Genetic Disorders, Intellectual Disability, Spatial Ability, Navigation
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Little, Katie; Riby, Deborah M.; Janes, Emily; Clark, Fiona; Fleck, Ruth; Rodgers, Jacqui – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2013
The developmental disorder of Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with an overfriendly personality type, including an increased tendency to approach strangers. This atypical social approach behaviour (SAB) has been linked to two potential theories: the amygdala hypothesis and the frontal lobe hypothesis. The current study aimed to investigate…
Descriptors: Inhibition, Personality Traits, Brain Hemisphere Functions, Children
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Watson, Shelley Lynn; Richards, Deborah A.; Miodrag, Nancy; Fedoroff, J. Paul – Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2012
Specific genetic syndromes affect individuals' sexual development, experiences, and fertility. Individuals with specific syndromes can also display inappropriate sexual behavior resulting from vulnerabilities presented by their genetic makeup. Using clinical case studies, we discuss the specific impact that Down, Prader-Willi, and Williams…
Descriptors: Sexuality, Sex Education, Adolescents, Intimacy
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Lee, Cheryl S.; Binder, Katherine S. – Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2014
Purpose: The current study examined semantic and phonological processing in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS). Previous research in language processing in individuals with WS suggests a complex linguistic system characterized by "deviant" semantic organization and differential phonological processing. Method: Two experiments…
Descriptors: Semantics, Phonology, Language Processing, Congenital Impairments
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Ito, Kiwako; Martens, Marilee A. – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2017
Background: Past reports on the speech production of individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) suggest that their prosody is anomalous and may lead to challenges in spoken communication. While existing prosodic assessments confirm that individuals with WS fail to use prosodic emphasis to express contrast, those reports typically lack detailed…
Descriptors: Suprasegmentals, Phonetics, Acoustics, Cues
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Mervis, Carolyn B. – Topics in Language Disorders, 2009
Williams syndrome is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion of approximately 25 genes on chromosome 7q11.23. Children with the syndrome evidence large individual differences in both broad language and reading abilities. Nevertheless, as a group, children with this syndrome show a consistent pattern characterized by relative…
Descriptors: Reading Comprehension, Phonics, Short Term Memory, Reading Ability
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Pinheiro, Ana P.; Galdo-Alvarez, Santaigo; Sampaio, Adriana; Niznikiewicz, Margaret; Goncalves, Oscar F. – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2010
Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder due to microdeletion in chromosome 7, has been described as a syndrome with an intriguing socio-cognitive phenotype. Cognitively, the relative preservation of language and face processing abilities coexists with severe deficits in visual-spatial tasks, as well as in tasks involving…
Descriptors: Sentences, Semantics, Language Processing, Spatial Ability
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Martinez-Castilla, Pastora; Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; Sotillo, Maria – Applied Psycholinguistics, 2012
The aim of this study was to compare the prosodic profiles of English- and Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS), examining cross-linguistic differences. Two groups of children with WS, English and Spanish, of similar chronological and nonverbal mental age, were compared on performance in expressive and receptive prosodic tasks…
Descriptors: Mental Age, Language Processing, Spanish Speaking, Contrastive Linguistics
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Capitao, Liliana; Sampaio, Adriana; Fernandez, Montse; Sousa, Nuno; Pinheiro, Ana; Goncalves, Oscar F. – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2011
Individuals with Williams syndrome display indiscriminate approach towards strangers. Neuroimaging studies conducted so far have linked this social profile to structural and/or functional abnormalities in WS amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In this study, the neuropsychological hypotheses of amygdala and prefrontal cortex involvement in WS…
Descriptors: Mental Age, Age, Nonverbal Communication, Profiles
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Naylor, Lauren; Van Herwegen, Jo – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2012
The current study investigated the development of figurative language production, including different types of figurative expressions, during a fictional narrative in 20 typically developing (TD) children and 20 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 7-18 years old. In contrast to previous studies, developmental trajectories showed that (1) the…
Descriptors: Figurative Language, Genetic Disorders, Comparative Analysis, Children
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Hsu, Ching-Fen – Research in Developmental Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 2013
Previous studies have shown that deficiencies in visuospatial perception and semantic processing in people with Williams syndrome (WS) are due to deficient central cohesiveness. Unlike previous studies that used abstract stimuli, this study used pictures to determine the relative ability of people with WS to integrate contextual information with…
Descriptors: Children, Context Effect, Semantics, Genetic Disorders
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