NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing all 4 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2012
Background: Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. Aim: The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family…
Descriptors: Aphasia, Adults, Rehabilitation, Family (Sociological Unit)
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Holland, Audrey L.; Halper, Anita S.; Cherney, Leora R. – American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 2010
Purpose: This study examined the content of 100 short scripts, co-constructed by persons with aphasia (PWA) and a clinician. The PWA subsequently learned the scripts by interacting with a computerized virtual therapist. The goal was to provide clinicians with ideas regarding content for treatment that is meaningful to PWAs. Method: Thirty-three…
Descriptors: Aphasia, Adults, Personal Narratives, Scripts
Sarno, Martha Taylor, Ed.; Woods, Diane E., Ed. – 1989
This monograph presents a "state of the art" overview of contemporary aphasia rehabilitation policies and resources in Asia and the Pacific region. Following Martha Taylor Sarno's introduction, Sumiko Sasanuma discusses the history and development of Japan's aphasia rehabilitation services, focusing on demography and data sources,…
Descriptors: Adults, Aphasia, Delivery Systems, Evaluation Methods
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Lesser, Ruth; And Others – International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 1986
Language Enrichment Therapy (LET), a program of language stimulation for aphasia developed in Finland, was tested by five British speech therapists with 13 adult stroke victims and their relatives. Results suggested the usefulness of a refined English version of LET as a cooperative tool for speech therapists and volunteer helpers. (JW)
Descriptors: Adults, Aphasia, Expressive Language, Family Involvement