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Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2013
This article vividly describes the indoor and outdoor components of what Montessori calls Home Sweet Home. Her vision of a domestic Children's House contains many facets: rooms of varied space, beautiful flooring, gardens that educate and evoke collaboration, and places for year-round exercise. This is a definitive yet rare Montessori article that…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Montessori Schools, Educational Environment, Physical Environment
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
These next two lectures succinctly discuss the necessary preparation and methods for observation. Using the naturalist Fabre as an example of scientific training of the faculties for sharp observation, Montessori compares the observer to a researcher and gives many suggestions for conducting thorough yet unobtrusive observation. Self-awareness of…
Descriptors: Observation, Evaluation Methods, Self Actualization, Children
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
Followers of Maria Montessori become accustomed to the oft-repeated stories that drive home a point, but here is a new treasure. This lecture tells of an experiment that Montessori began with 12- to 14-year-old children and then with 10-year-olds. When the poetry of Dante was introduced to these students, they became passionate and grew to love…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Teaching Methods, Preadolescents, Early Adolescents
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
Montessori's idea of the child's nature and the teacher's perceptiveness begins with amazing simplicity, and when she speaks of "methods evolved," she is unveiling a methodological system for observation. She begins with the early childhood explosion into writing, which is a familiar child phenomenon that Montessori has written about…
Descriptors: Observation, Montessori Method, Montessori Schools, Early Childhood Education
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
"The Advanced Montessori Method, Volume 1" was published in 1918 in English and is considered a seminal work along with "The Montessori Method." In the foreword to this book, Mario Montessori writes: "...the refulgent figure of the child, Dr. Montessori pointed out, who had found his own path to mental health, who…
Descriptors: Attention, Montessori Method, Observation, Child Development
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
Montessori discusses the importance of the calm inner life (the soul) of the very young child. She stresses the importance of the soul's self-management, the child knowing what he needs to do, and of course, being allowed to do what he needs to do. The child can repeat the exercise or move ahead according to minimal clear and precise guidance from…
Descriptors: Young Children, Montessori Method, Observation, Student Role
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
Using examples from the animal world, Montessori speaks of the natural laws of life and the phases of childhood that are different than that of the adult. The child develops independently of the adult. Montessori says, "The child is the period when man is created," and "The child is a worker." Through work, the child can arrive…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Child Development, Animals, Observation
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
This lecture discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." This lecture was delivered at the International Training Course, London, 1921. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications" (2008).]
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Early Childhood Education, Observation, Classroom Observation Techniques
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2016
This article exhorts the observer to take notice of the unconscious and conscious levels of the young child's absorbent mind (infant stare). Montessori notes the social awareness of young children and suggests that their amazing awareness of people, not merely their activities, is integral to observation. [Reprinted with permission from "AMI…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Young Children, Observation, Cognitive Processes
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2015
"Man and SuperNature" is a lyrical chapter in the 1946 London course following the emergence of Cosmic Education in Kodaikanal, India. Montessori contrasts the adaptation required of animals for their survival to conscious human adaptation. Animals exist and adapt to nature, but man can alter nature and change the environment.…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, World Views, Adjustment (to Environment)
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2015
Only when we look at education from birth and follow the inner development of the child from the beginning can we truly see the child's psychological progress. Montessori states that personality cannot develop fully without freedom; even the formation of healthy social life requires freedom to associate, not coercion. The early childhood level…
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Child Development, Personality Development, Freedom
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2013
This piece of writing addresses the "boundless" garden created through the web of foresight and patience combined with the spontaneous activity necessary for growing food and harvesting the bounty. Most will be familiar with this unique writing by Montessori who suggests that it is not the work and actual produce of the garden but the…
Descriptors: Natural Resources, Montessori Method, Outdoor Education, Food
Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2013
We include the ninth chapter of "Education and Peace" by Maria Montessori (1949) to draw attention to the relationship between peace and sustainability. Nature is an integral part of peace studies. [Reprinted from "Education and Peace," pages 66-70, copyright © 1972 by Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company.]
Descriptors: Montessori Method, Peace, Sustainability, Physical Environment
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Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2001
Presents the underlying assumptions for the Erdkinder concept of educating adolescents. Discusses the importance of independence and social life beyond the family, the necessary environmental awareness for youth in the context of civilization, the meaning behind social values of civilization, and the importance of social morals, social…
Descriptors: Adolescent Development, Adolescents, Childhood Needs, Montessori Method
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Montessori, Maria – NAMTA Journal, 2001
Maintains that moral education should be at the foundation of educational reform and that education should prepare adolescents to find their place in society. Asserts that secondary level instruction, provided in a rural neutral environment and with opportunities for adolescents to work with their hands and their minds, will help to create a more…
Descriptors: Adolescent Development, Adolescents, Childhood Needs, Educational Change
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