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ERIC Number: EJ799879
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Jun
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0046-9157
Syndrome by Any Other Name. . .
Bowers, Drew
Exceptional Parent, v38 n6 p43-44 Jun 2008
The word "syndrome" is one of those words that has slipped into one's vocabulary with few realizing what exactly it means or all the implications it carries. The word "syndrome" can be defined as "a group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition." Typically, a syndrome will be defined by major symptoms or signs, which must be present, and minor symptoms or signs, which may or may not be present. The word is used to facilitate classification and study of and also communication about certain conditions. The fact that a set of symptoms has been classified as a syndrome does not mean that everyone with that syndrome experiences the symptoms in the same way or that they contracted it in the same way or ways. Therefore, classifying conditions as a syndrome has advantages and disadvantages. On one hand, classification, diagnosis, discussion, and, ultimately, treatment of the condition may become easier with classification as a syndrome. However, the concept of a syndrome may also lead to overgeneralization about a condition. Individuals may even come to be defined by their syndrome. Whatever the case, syndromes should be considered a useful concept. They spread awareness about and research for certain conditions. When applied properly, they do not limit individuals and instead are a great tool to reaching maximum personal potential.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A