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Shao, Jing; Lau, Rebecca Yick Man; Tang, Phyllis Oi Ching; Zhang, Caicai – Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 2019
Purpose: Congenital amusia is an inborn neurogenetic disorder of fine-grained pitch processing. This study attempted to pinpoint the impairment mechanism of speech processing in tonal language speakers with amusia. We designed a series of perception tasks aiming at selectively probing low-level pitch processing and relatively high-level…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Tone Languages, Sino Tibetan Languages, Speech Impairments
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Liu, Fang; Patel, Aniruddh D.; Fourcin, Adrian; Stewart, Lauren – Brain, 2010
This study investigated whether congenital amusia, a neuro-developmental disorder of musical perception, also has implications for speech intonation processing. In total, 16 British amusics and 16 matched controls completed five intonation perception tasks and two pitch threshold tasks. Compared with controls, amusics showed impaired performance…
Descriptors: Intonation, Cognitive Processes, Music, Congenital Impairments
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Albouy, Philippe; Mattout, Jeremie; Bouet, Romain; Maby, Emmanuel; Sanchez, Gaetan; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Daligault, Sebastien; Delpuech, Claude; Bertrand, Olivier; Caclin, Anne; Tillmann, Barbara – Brain, 2013
Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder of music perception and production. The present study investigated the cerebral bases of impaired pitch perception and memory in congenital amusia using behavioural measures, magnetoencephalography and voxel-based morphometry. Congenital amusics and matched control subjects performed two melodic tasks (a…
Descriptors: Music, Congenital Impairments, Perceptual Impairments, Neurological Impairments
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Nan, Yun; Sun, Yanan; Peretz, Isabelle – Brain, 2010
Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder that affects the processing of musical pitch in speakers of non-tonal languages like English and French. We assessed whether this musical disorder exists among speakers of Mandarin Chinese who use pitch to alter the meaning of words. Using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia, we tested 117…
Descriptors: Music, Tone Languages, Mandarin Chinese, Disabilities
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Tillmann, Barbara; Schulze, Katrin; Foxton, Jessica M. – Brain and Cognition, 2009
Congenital amusia refers to a lifelong disorder of music processing and is linked to pitch-processing deficits. The present study investigated congenital amusics' short-term memory for tones, musical timbres and words. Sequences of five events (tones, timbres or words) were presented in pairs and participants had to indicate whether the sequences…
Descriptors: Short Term Memory, Memorization, Music, Cognitive Processes
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Sarkamo, Teppo; Tervaniemi, Mari; Soinila, Seppo; Autti, Taina; Silvennoinen, Heli M.; Laine, Matti; Hietanen, Marja – Neuropsychologia, 2009
Recent evidence on amusia suggests that our ability to perceive music might be based on the same neural resources that underlie other higher cognitive functions, such as speech perception and spatial processing. We studied the neural correlates of acquired amusia by performing extensive neuropsychological assessments on 53 stroke patients with a…
Descriptors: Neurological Impairments, Brain, Music, Perception
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Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Jarvenpaa, Miika; Tervaniemi, Mari – Brain, 2009
Like language, music engagement is universal, complex and present early in life. However, approximately 4% of the general population experiences a lifelong deficit in music perception that cannot be explained by hearing loss, brain damage, intellectual deficiencies or lack of exposure. This musical disorder, commonly known as tone-deafness and now…
Descriptors: Music, Neurological Impairments, Neurological Organization, Cognitive Processes
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Liu, Fang; Xu, Yi; Patel, Aniruddh D.; Francart, Tom; Jiang, Cunmei – Brain and Cognition, 2012
This study examined whether "melodic contour deafness" (insensitivity to the direction of pitch movement) in congenital amusia is associated with specific types of pitch patterns (discrete versus gliding pitches) or stimulus types (speech syllables versus complex tones). Thresholds for identification of pitch direction were obtained using discrete…
Descriptors: Intonation, Auditory Stimuli, Auditory Perception, Mandarin Chinese
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Moreau, Patricia; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Peretz, Isabelle – Brain and Cognition, 2013
Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder characterized by a difficulty in perceiving and producing music despite normal intelligence and hearing. Behavioral data have indicated that it originates from a deficit in fine-grained pitch discrimination, and is expressed by the absence of a P3b event-related brain response for pitch differences smaller…
Descriptors: Brain Hemisphere Functions, Auditory Discrimination, Music, Learning Problems
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Williamson, Victoria J.; Cocchini, Gianna; Stewart, Lauren – Brain and Cognition, 2011
Congenital amusia manifests as a lifelong difficulty in making sense of musical sound. The extent to which this disorder is accompanied by deficits in visuo-spatial processing is an important question, bearing on the issue of whether pitch processing draws on supramodal spatial representations. The present study assessed different aspects of…
Descriptors: Music Education, Intonation, Learning Problems, Music
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Foxton, Jessica M.; Nandy, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Timothy D. – Brain and Cognition, 2006
It is commonly observed that "tone deaf" individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ("tone deafness") and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were…
Descriptors: Music, Auditory Stimuli, Auditory Perception, Comparative Analysis
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Hubbard, Timothy L. – Psychological Bulletin, 2010
The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…
Descriptors: Verbal Stimuli, Auditory Stimuli, Schizophrenia, Auditory Discrimination
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Hutchins, Sean; Peretz, Isabelle – Brain and Language, 2013
We tested whether congenital amusics, who exhibit pitch perception deficits, nevertheless adjust the pitch of their voice in response to a sudden pitch shift applied to vocal feedback. Nine amusics and matched controls imitated their own previously-recorded speech or singing, while the online feedback they received was shifted mid-utterance by 25…
Descriptors: Accuracy, Feedback (Response), Singing, Intonation
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Murayama, Junko; Kashiwagi, Toshihiro; Kashiwagi, Asako; Mimura, Masaru – Brain and Cognition, 2004
Pre- and postmorbid singing of a patient with amusia due to a right-hemispheric infarction was analyzed acoustically. This particular patient had a premorbid tape recording of her own singing without accompaniment. Appropriateness of pitch interval and rhythm was evaluated based on ratios of pitch and duration between neighboring notes. The…
Descriptors: Neurological Impairments, Patients, Singing, Music
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Franklin, Elda – Music Educators Journal, 1981
Reviews studies on the etiology of monotonism, the monotone being that type of uncertain or inaccurate singer who cannot vocally match pitches and who has trouble accurately reproducing even a familiar song. Neurological factors (amusia, right brain abnormalities), age, and sex differences are considered. (Author/SJL)
Descriptors: Adults, Age Differences, Cerebral Dominance, Elementary Secondary Education