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ERIC Number: ED550790
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2012
Pages: 165
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3030-1269-3
ISSN: N/A
An Examination of Principal Leadership Styles and Their Influence on School Performance as Measured by Adequate Yearly Progress at Selected Title I Elementary Schools in South Carolina
Martin, Tammy Faith
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, South Carolina State University
The purpose of this study was to examine principal leadership styles and their influence on school performance as measured by adequate yearly progress at selected Title I schools in South Carolina. The main focus of the research study was to complete descriptive statistics on principal leadership styles in schools that met or did not meet adequate yearly progress in Title I elementary schools in South Carolina. Elementary principals were asked to complete the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire by Avolio and Bass (2004) to determine his or her leadership styles. The principal's completion of the survey determined whether he or she exhibited leadership characteristics related to transformational, transactional, or laissez-faire (passive) leadership. Once the descriptive statistics were completed, the researcher further examined whether the leadership style had a significant difference based on gender, race, and years of experience. The overall goal was to determine if there was a relationship between school performance and the principal's leadership style and whether there was a significant difference in the schools that met adequate yearly progress and the schools that did not meet adequate yearly progress. The research indicated that there is no significant difference in leadership styles in schools that met adequate yearly progress and those schools that did not meet adequate yearly progress. The only significant difference that was indicated in this research study involved the variable of race within the transformational leadership styles of those principals in schools that met and did not meet adequate yearly progress. The literature review of this study discussed the historical perspective and evolution of leadership styles. Hughes (1999) stated that for much of human history, there had been extensive research conducted regarding the study of leadership and management, especially during the first half of the twentieth century. Burns (1978) indicated that leadership depends upon relationships and shared values between leaders and followers. Bass and Avolio (1994) concurred that leadership can be broken down into three distinct styles: transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. For over 25 years, the transactional-transformational leadership model had been a large part of leadership research and theory. This study sought to connect leadership theories to Title I school performance based on the No Child Left Behind accountability standards. This study incorporated principles of quantitative research to test the answers to the identified research questions proposed by this researcher. A total of 60 surveys were originally sent to school principals. Of these, 39 were returned to the researcher via Survey Monkey. The principal survey which consisted of the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire by Bass and Avolio (2004) was sent to randomly selected school districts and schools who met the criteria of meeting or not meeting adequate yearly progress for the 2010 school year. The principal survey return rate was 65% (39 out of 60). Data used in this study were examined using the following statistical procedures: descriptive statistics and t-tests. In order to answer the research questions and to determine if there was a significant difference between the dependent variable (leadership style) and the independent variable (school performance), a t-test was performed to determine the mean differences. Thirty-nine principals representing Title I elementary schools in South Carolina were participants in this study. From a descriptive perspective, the principals in schools that met adequate yearly progress and those schools that did not meet adequate yearly progress did not have any significant difference as it related to years of experience, gender, and race. The mean scores for the various leadership styles of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire were not significant and in the same range from each style. The questions from the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire were linked to the three main leadership styles and then analyzed to determine if there were significant differences between schools that met and did not meet adequate yearly progress. The results did reveal that the only dependent variable that had a significant difference between the schools that met adequate yearly progress and those that did not was race within the transformational leadership style. All other variables did not make a significant difference. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: South Carolina
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: No Child Left Behind Act 2001
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire