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Watson, Marcia – Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 2014
The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical and conceptual link between Ella Baker's Freedom School model and Paulo Freire's demand for critical education and emancipatory learning. Ella Baker, situated in the daunting environment of the Civil Rights Movement, saw education as a tool for social mobility for Mississippi residents in 1964.…
Descriptors: Schools, Civil Rights, Social Justice, Educational Change
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Bonastia, Christopher – History of Education Quarterly, 2016
In July 1963, students from Queens College (QC) and a group of New York City teachers traveled to Prince Edward County (PEC), Virginia, to teach local black youth in Freedom Schools. The county had eliminated public education four years earlier to avoid a desegregation order. PEC Freedom Schools represented the first major effort to recruit an…
Descriptors: Instructional Leadership, African Americans, Counties, Expertise
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Hale, Jon N. – Journal of Social Studies Research, 2011
This article examines the history of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools to illustrate how integrating the Civil Rights Movement into the social studies curriculum refocuses the aims of American education on participatory democracy. Teaching the Civil Rights Movement and employing the teaching strategies used in the Freedom Schools leads to the…
Descriptors: Achievement Gap, Civil Rights, Freedom, Democracy
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Etienne, Leslie – Peabody Journal of Education, 2013
The civil rights movement of the late 1950s and 1960s had a transformational effect on American society and on grassroots movements for social justice at home and abroad during that era and beyond. But much of the history of the push for racial equality in America is often told as if it is on a constant repetitive loop, when other accounts are…
Descriptors: Males, African Americans, Summer Programs, Freedom
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Perlstein, Daniel – History of Education Quarterly, 1990
Examines the Mississippi Freedom Schools, organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) during the 1964 summer, that were designed to empower Black students to transform society. Analyzes the schools' teaching practices based on student experiences and promoting self-discovery and expression. Identifies institutional limits in…
Descriptors: Activism, Black History, Civil Rights, Consciousness Raising
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Ligon, Jerry A.; Chilcoat, George W. – Journal of Curriculum and Supervision, 1999
In 1963, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee established Freedom Schools as part of civil-rights undertakings to assist African Americans in Mississippi. Results of the curriculum conference that created the alternative summer-school program may help educators implement critical pedagogy in today's schools. Contains 61 references. (MLH)
Descriptors: Civil Rights, Conferences, Curriculum Design, Democratic Values
Payne, Charles M. – 1997
Self-consciously activist education has a long history among African-Americans; however, it is one of the least well-understood aspects of African American struggle. This paper addresses one chapter in that history, the Freedom Schools that operated in Mississippi during the summer of 1964 and for a while thereafter. The schools were the creation…
Descriptors: Black Leadership, Black Power, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness