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Showing 1 to 15 of 16 results Save | Export
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Watson, Marcia – Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 2014
The purpose of this paper is to provide a historical and conceptual link between Ella Baker's Freedom School model and Paulo Freire's demand for critical education and emancipatory learning. Ella Baker, situated in the daunting environment of the Civil Rights Movement, saw education as a tool for social mobility for Mississippi residents in 1964.…
Descriptors: Schools, Civil Rights, Social Justice, Educational Change
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Bonastia, Christopher – History of Education Quarterly, 2016
In July 1963, students from Queens College (QC) and a group of New York City teachers traveled to Prince Edward County (PEC), Virginia, to teach local black youth in Freedom Schools. The county had eliminated public education four years earlier to avoid a desegregation order. PEC Freedom Schools represented the first major effort to recruit an…
Descriptors: Instructional Leadership, African Americans, Counties, Expertise
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Hale, Jon N. – Journal of Social Studies Research, 2011
This article examines the history of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Schools to illustrate how integrating the Civil Rights Movement into the social studies curriculum refocuses the aims of American education on participatory democracy. Teaching the Civil Rights Movement and employing the teaching strategies used in the Freedom Schools leads to the…
Descriptors: Achievement Gap, Civil Rights, Freedom, Democracy
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Hale, Jon N. – American Educational History Journal, 2007
During the summer of 1964, Mississippi communities and activists established forty-one "Freedom Schools" that served over two thousand students. The Mississippi Freedom Schools embodied a critical philosophy of education. Despite its grassroots orientation, the educational ideas espoused in the Freedom Schools did not necessarily…
Descriptors: Folk Schools, Freedom, Social Change, Educational Experience
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Fife, Brian L. – Global Education Review, 2016
The common school philosophy of the nineteenth century in the United States is revisited from a contemporary perspective. Is the basic ethos of the philosophy of Horace Mann and others still relevant today? This question is examined and applied to the conservative advocacy of free markets, individual freedom, and school choice in order to assess…
Descriptors: School Choice, Educational Philosophy, Educational History, Advocacy
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Anttila, Erkko; Turtiainen, Jussi; Varje, Pekka; Väänänen, Ari – Pedagogy, Culture and Society, 2018
The study examines Finnish discussions on student-centred school culture and teachers' emotional labour from a sociological and historical perspective. It employs a thematic analysis of articles published in a Finnish teachers' professional magazine from 1979 to 2011. In interpreting the data, the study draws from emotional labour research and…
Descriptors: School Culture, Student Centered Learning, Emotional Response, Educational History
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Etienne, Leslie – Peabody Journal of Education, 2013
The civil rights movement of the late 1950s and 1960s had a transformational effect on American society and on grassroots movements for social justice at home and abroad during that era and beyond. But much of the history of the push for racial equality in America is often told as if it is on a constant repetitive loop, when other accounts are…
Descriptors: Males, African Americans, Summer Programs, Freedom
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Logue, Jennifer – Philosophical Studies in Education, 2008
John Dewey's pragmatism and progressive education sought to nourish the democratic principles of critical thinking and collective social action, which he saw as central to democracy and threatened by what Jürgen Habermas would call the rise of "instrumental rationality." Dewey was concerned that traditional approaches to education…
Descriptors: Freedom, Intervention, Teaching Methods, Citizenship
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Dahlgren, Robert L. – Cogent Education, 2016
Academic freedom has long been a sacrosanct principle in higher education; however, the same rights to intellectual autonomy have rarely been afforded K-12 practitioners. In times of national political crisis, the abilities of teachers to engage students in the crucial debates about contemporary public policy issues have been stretched to the…
Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Public Schools, Educational History, United States History
Emery, Kathy – Teacher Education Quarterly, 2007
In the last 20 years, public education in the United States has been transformed under the pressures of high-stakes testing. Some argue that right wing ideologues are out to privatize the public school system in order to wring as much profit from the system as they can. Others argue that the new reforms are needed because for too long, teachers…
Descriptors: High Stakes Tests, Public Education, Educational Change, Educational Objectives
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Nir, Adam; Ben-David, Adi; Bogler, Ronit; Inbar, Dan; Zohar, Anat – International Journal of Educational Management, 2016
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze two parallel processes in the Israeli educational system: first, the idea of school autonomy, exploring its origins and its pedagogical implications and effectiveness; and second, the development of the progressive education evident mainly in the cognitive domain of twenty-first century skills (21st…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Institutional Autonomy, Educational Practices, School Effectiveness
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Perlstein, Daniel – History of Education Quarterly, 1990
Examines the Mississippi Freedom Schools, organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) during the 1964 summer, that were designed to empower Black students to transform society. Analyzes the schools' teaching practices based on student experiences and promoting self-discovery and expression. Identifies institutional limits in…
Descriptors: Activism, Black History, Civil Rights, Consciousness Raising
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Ligon, Jerry A.; Chilcoat, George W. – Journal of Curriculum and Supervision, 1999
In 1963, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee established Freedom Schools as part of civil-rights undertakings to assist African Americans in Mississippi. Results of the curriculum conference that created the alternative summer-school program may help educators implement critical pedagogy in today's schools. Contains 61 references. (MLH)
Descriptors: Civil Rights, Conferences, Curriculum Design, Democratic Values
Payne, Charles M. – 1997
Self-consciously activist education has a long history among African-Americans; however, it is one of the least well-understood aspects of African American struggle. This paper addresses one chapter in that history, the Freedom Schools that operated in Mississippi during the summer of 1964 and for a while thereafter. The schools were the creation…
Descriptors: Black Leadership, Black Power, Civil Rights, Cultural Awareness
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Scott, Osborne – Urban Review, 1976
Argues that the conscience that the colonialists brought into the period of slavery required the assumption that the slave learner was somehow different from other learners. This is a concept that still has great currency in education. Much of the struggle for freedom now is a struggle to overcome this concept. (Author/JM)
Descriptors: Black Attitudes, Black Education, Educational Attitudes, Educational History
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