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Cheung, Jeffrey J. H.; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M.; Woods, Nicole N.; Moulton, Carol-anne; Ringsted, Charlotte V.; Brydges, Ryan – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2018
Transfer is a desired outcome of simulation-based training, yet evidence for how instructional design features promote transfer is lacking. In clinical reasoning, transfer is improved when trainees experience instruction integrating basic science explanations with clinical signs and symptoms. To test whether integrated instruction has similar…
Descriptors: Transfer of Training, Teaching Methods, Rating Scales, Pretests Posttests
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Lean, Lyn Li; Hong, Ryan Yee Shiun; Ti, Lian Kah – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2017
Communication of feedback during teaching of practical procedures is a fine balance of structure and timing. We investigate if continuous in-task (IT) or end-task feedback (ET) is more effective in teaching spinal anaesthesia to medical students. End-task feedback was hypothesized to improve both short-term and long-term procedural learning…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Anesthesiology, Retention (Psychology), Training
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Alam, Fahad; Boet, Sylvain; Piquette, Dominique; Lai, Anita; Perkes, Christopher P.; LeBlanc, Vicki R. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2016
Enhanced podcasts increase learning, but evidence is lacking on how they should be designed to optimize their effectiveness. This study assessed the impact two learning instructional design methods (mental practice and modeling), either on their own or in combination, for teaching complex cognitive medical content when incorporated into enhanced…
Descriptors: Electronic Learning, Handheld Devices, Audio Equipment, Instructional Design
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Yammine, Kaissar; Violato, Claudio – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2016
There are various educational methods used in anatomy teaching. While three dimensional (3D) visualization technologies are gaining ground due to their ever-increasing realism, reports investigating physical models as a low-cost 3D traditional method are still the subject of considerable interest. The aim of this meta-analysis is to quantitatively…
Descriptors: Anatomy, Models, Medical Education, Meta Analysis
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Dobson, John L.; Linderholm, Tracy – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2015
The testing effect shows that learning is enhanced by the act of recalling information after exposure. Although the testing effect is among the most robust findings in cognitive science, much of its empirical support is from laboratory studies and it has been applied as a strategy for enhancing learning in the classroom in a limited fashion. The…
Descriptors: Anatomy, Physiology, Science Instruction, Universities
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Chan, Angela; Singh, Sunita; Dubrowski, Adam; Pratt, Daniel D.; Zalunardo, Nadia; Nair, Parvarthy; McLaughlin, Kevin; Ma, Irene W. Y. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2015
Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a complex but commonly performed procedure. How best to teach this complex skill has not been clearly delineated. We conducted a randomized trial of the effects of two types of teaching of CVC on skill acquisition and retention. We randomly assigned novice internal medicine residents to learning CVC in-part…
Descriptors: Health Education, Control Groups, Experimental Groups, Skill Development
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Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A.; Zendejas, Benjamin; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Brydges, Ryan – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2014
Although feedback has been identified as a key instructional feature in simulation based medical education (SBME), we remain uncertain as to the magnitude of its effectiveness and the mechanisms by which it may be effective. We employed a meta-analysis and critical narrative synthesis to examine the effectiveness of feedback for SBME procedural…
Descriptors: Medical Education, Medical Students, Feedback (Response), Simulation
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Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Hofman, W. H. A.; Muijtjens, A. M. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, J. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2013
The influence of problem-based learning (PBL) and open-book tests on long-term knowledge retention is unclear and subject of discussion. Hypotheses were that PBL as well as open-book tests positively affect long-term knowledge retention. Four progress test results of fifth and sixth-year medical students (n = 1,648) of three medical schools were…
Descriptors: Medical Students, Medical Education, Problem Based Learning, Measures (Individuals)
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Sullivan, Peter B.; Gregg, Nicky; Adams, Emily; Rodgers, Caroline; Hull, Jeremy – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2013
Few educational studies have investigated how well information learned by medical students is retained over time. The primary aim of this study was to investigate how much of the paediatric core curriculum undergraduates remembered a year after originally passing their paediatrics examination. In addition, we looked at whether students'…
Descriptors: Core Curriculum, Pediatrics, Medical Students, Medical Education
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Consoli, Anna; Fraser, Kristin; Ma, Irene; Sobczak, Matthew; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2013
Although simulation training improves post-training performance, it is unclear how well performance soon after simulation training predicts longer term outcomes (i.e., learning). Here our objective was to assess the predictive value of performance 1 h post-training of performance 6 weeks later. We trained 84 first year medical students a simulated…
Descriptors: Simulation, Medical Students, Medical Education, Teaching Methods
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Larsen, Douglas P.; Butler, Andrew C.; Lawson, Amy L.; Roediger, Henry L., III – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2013
Previous research has shown that repeated retrieval with written tests produces superior long-term retention compared to repeated study. However, the degree to which this increased retention transfers to clinical application has not been investigated. In addition, increased retention obtained through written testing has not been compared to other…
Descriptors: Medical Students, Medical Education, Patients, Retention (Psychology)
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Pourshanazari, A. A.; Roohbakhsh, A.; Khazaei, M.; Tajadini, H. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2013
The rapid improvements in medical sciences and the ever-increasing related data, however, require novel methods of instruction. One such method, which has been given less than due attention in Iran, is problem-based learning (PBL). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of study skills and the PBL methods on short and long-term retention…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Medical Students, Problem Based Learning, Conventional Instruction
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Goldszmidt, Mark; Minda, John Paul; Devantier, Sarah L.; Skye, Aimee L.; Woods, Nicole N. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2012
Current research suggests a role for biomedical knowledge in learning and retaining concepts related to medical diagnosis. However, learning may be influenced by other, non-biomedical knowledge. We explored this idea using an experimental design and examined the effects of causal knowledge on the learning, retention, and interpretation of medical…
Descriptors: Learning, Diseases, Human Body, Multiple Choice Tests
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Custers, Eugene J. F. M. – Advances in Health Sciences Education, 2010
In this paper, a review of long-term retention of basic science knowledge is presented. First, it is argued that retention of this knowledge has been a long-standing problem in medical education. Next, three types of studies are described that are employed in the literature to investigate long-term retention of knowledge in general. Subsequently,…
Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Medical Education, Retention (Psychology), Science Education