NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing 1 to 15 of 44 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Vasquez, Melba J. T. – American Psychologist, 2012
Much of psychological science and knowledge is significantly relevant to social justice, defined here as the goal to decrease human suffering and to promote human values of equality and justice. A commitment to social justice has evolved as a more important value in the last few decades for psychology, including for the American Psychological…
Descriptors: Social Justice, Ethics, Psychology, Strategic Planning
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Raver, C. Cybele – American Psychologist, 2012
Over 21% of children in the United States today are poor, and the income gap between our nation's richest and poorest children has widened dramatically over time. This article considers children's self-regulation as a key mediating mechanism through which poverty has deleterious consequences for their later life outcomes. Evidence from field…
Descriptors: Evidence, Policy Formation, Social Change, Poverty
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Steinberg, Laurence; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Woolard, Jennifer; Graham, Sandra; Banich, Marie – American Psychologist, 2009
The authors respond to both the general and specific concerns raised in Fischer, Stein, and Heikkinen's commentary on their article (Steinberg, Cauffman, Woolard, Graham, & Banich), in which they drew on studies of adolescent development to justify the American Psychological Association's positions in two Supreme Court cases involving the…
Descriptors: Adolescent Development, Maturity (Individuals), Court Litigation, Reader Response
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
American Psychologist, 2008
Each year, the American Psychological Association's Policy and Planning Board takes the pulse of the Association and the discipline as a whole and writes a report that represents the Board's best appraisal of a fundamental policy. Our main objective, however, is not simply to assess the current situation but to look forward on behalf of the…
Descriptors: Psychologists, Psychology, Annual Reports, Professional Associations
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Wendt, Dennis C., Jr.; Slife, Brent D. – American Psychologist, 2007
In its policy rationale for evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) claims to have constituted itself with "scientists and practitioners from a wide range of perspectives and traditions, reflecting the diverse perspectives within the field" (p. 273). We…
Descriptors: Psychology, Psychologists, Misconceptions, Evidence
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
American Psychologist, 2005
This report addresses the challenges that the American Psychological Association (APA) must face before attaining a perfect vision. It is divided into three sections: (a) meeting the needs of psychology and psychologists in the 21st century; (b) psychology and health care, working toward a true integration of biological, psychological, social, and…
Descriptors: Psychology, Professional Associations, Psychologists, Governing Boards
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
American Psychologist, 2005
In August 2001, the American Psychological Association (APA) Council of Representatives approved as APA policy the "Criteria for Practice Guideline Development and Evaluation" (APA, 2002b), developed by the Board of Professional Affairs Committee on Professional Practice and Standards (COPPS). The present document was developed in response to a…
Descriptors: Documentation, Guidelines, Professional Associations, Evaluation Criteria
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Sammons, Morgan T. – American Psychologist, 2005
The response of military psychology in times of war or other great public crises may presage the success of the profession in less perilous times. The ability of public-sector psychologists to provide assistance and improve the common welfare during conflict or turmoil is generally followed by an increased demand for psychological services. This…
Descriptors: Psychological Patterns, War, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Psychological Services
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Johnson, Norine G. – American Psychologist, 2003
Since World War II, American psychology's role in health care has significantly expanded. This was formally recognized in 2001 when the membership of the American Psychological Association (APA) approved a bylaw change in its mission statement to include the word health. An accumulating body of research demonstrates and recent reviews conclude…
Descriptors: Position Papers, Psychology, Wellness, Psychological Studies
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Reed, Geoffrey M.; McLaughlin, Christopher J.; Newman, Russ – American Psychologist, 2002
Discusses guidelines for professional practice and related policy development by the American Psychological Association's (APA) Board of Professional Affairs over the past decade, explaining that the APA policy distinguishes two types of guidelines for professional practice: treatment guidelines (providing specific recommendations about treatments…
Descriptors: Guidelines, Mental Health, Policy Formation, Psychological Services
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Russo, Nancy Felipe; Denmark, Florence L. – American Psychologist, 1984
Highlights psychologists' roles and contributions to policy development in the areas of employment, deinstitutionalization, family violence, science and technology, and education. Focuses on psychologists' participation in creating policies that respond to the realities of women's changing social roles. (KH)
Descriptors: Citizen Participation, Females, Policy Formation, Political Issues
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Klein, Susan S.; Simonson, Joy – American Psychologist, 1984
Despite passage of laws regarding sex equity in education, full equity has yet to be attained. Psychologists have identified educational inequities and have provided educators with research-based programs, practices, and policies. But more research is needed to guide cost-effective policy formation and to identify the subtler forms of inequity.…
Descriptors: Equal Education, Policy Formation, Psychological Studies, Public Policy
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Takanishi, Ruby; And Others – American Psychologist, 1983
Stresses that the psychological community should be involved in shaping public policy for children, youth, and families who will be adversely affected by proposed Federal budget cuts in social programs. Summarizes issues discussed in the articles that follow in the same volume. (MJL)
Descriptors: Children, Government Role, Policy Formation, Psychologists
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Melton, Gary B. – American Psychologist, 1983
Current presumptions about adolescents' incompetence as decision makers are largely unsupported by psychological research. There are psychological and social benefits in recognizing adolescents as autonomous persons with independent interests in liberty and privacy. Policymakers should consider adolescents' rights in decisions concerning…
Descriptors: Adolescents, Behavioral Science Research, Child Advocacy, Childrens Rights
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Shah, Saleem A. – American Psychologist, 1978
Social scientists need to become more concerned with the study of dangerous behaviors and practices in our society, especially in light of the disproportionate injury and harm suffered by socially disadvantaged groups. (Author)
Descriptors: Antisocial Behavior, Behavior Patterns, Definitions, Disadvantaged
Previous Page | Next Page ยป
Pages: 1  |  2  |  3