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Paulsen, Rhonda L. – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 2003
Aboriginal literacy encompasses oral tradition, culture, language, identity, and world view in addition to the written word, and is a process of lifelong learning, much of which occurs beyond school walls. When defining Native literacy, one must move away from measuring Aboriginal students by Euro-Western definitions and move toward a balanced,…
Descriptors: American Indian Education, Cultural Maintenance, Educational Needs, Hegemony
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Sterling, Shirley – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 2002
A grandmother teaching fishtrap building by actually building one while telling a story provides a model and criteria for success in teaching Nlakapamux children, the most important criterion being the presence of cultural experts--grandmothers. Role-modeling, storytelling, and hands-on experience combine theory and practice and provide a mnemonic…
Descriptors: American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Cultural Education, Educational Strategies
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Cohen, Bill – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 2001
The spider's web is presented as a model for Indigenous education and community transformation, grounded in Okanagan philosophy. Children are at the center and benefit from the influence of extended family and community. The model's relevance for language revitalization, cultural maintenance, and educational planning and assessment is discussed.…
Descriptors: American Indian Education, Community Role, Cultural Maintenance, Educational Philosophy
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Johnson, Carl Garth – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 2001
Non-Native scholarly interpretations of The Three Bears--a traditional story of the Nlha7kapmx Nation--focus on mythology as simplistic science to explain the physical world. In contrast, a Nlha7kapmx interpretation illuminates connections of land to people. Such stories reinforce cultural identity and teach young people about the spiritual power…
Descriptors: American Indian Literature, Canada Natives, Cultural Context, Cultural Maintenance
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Antone, Eileen M. – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 2000
Euro-Western schooling imposed on Canada Natives was meant to destroy their culture and caused great alienation. This qualitative study of Onyota'a:ka (Oneida) Indians indicates that bilingual, bicultural education is needed to restore a strong Native identity. Education must validate traditional knowledge, values, and skills for Onyota'a:ka…
Descriptors: Acculturation, American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Colonialism
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Armstrong, Jeannette C. – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1987
Contrasts the modern definition of education (schooling) with the traditional indigenous view that focuses on education as a natural process occurring during everyday activities. Argues that traditional indigenous education ensures cultural continuity and survival of the mental, spiritual, emotional, and physical well-being of the cultural unit…
Descriptors: Cultural Background, Cultural Education, Folk Culture, Indigenous Populations
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Mader, Christina – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1998
A Canadian teacher-educator's research into what has meaning for Bush Cree students became a reciprocal learning-teaching relationship. What emerged is a reverence for the ordinary, and the researcher's realization that in Cree society, the medium and the message are one, just as education and culture are one. Contains photographs used in the…
Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Cree (Tribe)
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Sterling, Shirley – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1992
Stories handed down about the author's two Salish great grandmothers illustrate two different styles of child-adult interaction (authoritarian versus egalitarian) and their effects on the learning process. These child-rearing/teaching styles are compared to monitorial and humanistic methods of classroom management. Implications for Native…
Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Child Rearing
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Akan, Linda – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1992
Alfred Manitopeyes, respected Salteaux elder, discusses the value of both traditional and white education and uses the metaphor of good talking and good walking to indicate the ethical responsibilities of teachers. His text is presented in English and Salteaux, with explanations of his discourse style and meaning. (SV)
Descriptors: American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Educational Philosophy, Elementary Secondary Education
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Lightning, Walter C. – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1992
Cree elder Louis Sunchild wrote on the nature of the mind and how to preserve mental health and balance, emphasizing that our minds were created for the exercise of compassion toward each other. Presented in English, Cree syllabics, and Cree roman orthography, with explanations on discourse style and meaning. (SV)
Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, Educational Philosophy, Intercultural Communication
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Larose, Francois – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1991
Summarizes elements of bush-oriented Algonquin technology and ideology with regard to relationships of learning to material culture, games, child rearing practices, and legends. Discusses influences of "traditional" educational methods on Native informal learning structures, using aspects of Bandura's social cognitive theory. Contains 22…
Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Child Rearing
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White, Ellen; Archibald, Jo-ann – Canadian Journal of Native Education, 1992
Salish elder Ellen White shares her thoughts, remembrances, life experiences, and traditional teachings. She discusses traditional modes of teaching children; the importance of story telling, experiential learning, metaphors, and spirituality in traditional education; and the personal characteristics of elders. The interviewer reflects on her…
Descriptors: American Indian Education, Canada Natives, Child Rearing, Ethnography