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Rauschenbach, Cornelia; Goritz, Anja S.; Hertel, Guido – Educational Gerontology, 2012
In light of an aging workforce, age stereotypes have become an important topic both for researchers and for practitioners. Among other effects, age stereotypes might predict discriminatory behavior at work. This study examined stereotypic beliefs about emotional resilience as a function of both targets' and judges' age. In a web-based study, 4,181…
Descriptors: Stereotypes, Age, Aging (Individuals), Social Discrimination
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Kosa, Katherine M.; Cates, Sheryl C.; Karns, Shawn; Godwin, Sandria L.; Coppings, Richard J. – Educational Gerontology, 2012
Natural disasters and other emergencies can cause an increased risk of foodborne illness. We conducted a nationally representative survey to understand consumers' knowledge and use of recommended practices during/after extended power outages and other emergencies. Because older adults are at an increased risk for foodborne illness, this paper…
Descriptors: Safety, Public Health, Food Standards, Emergency Programs
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Xie, Bo; Watkins, Ivan; Golbeck, Jen; Huang, Man – Educational Gerontology, 2012
An exploratory study was conducted to answer the following questions: What are older adults' perceptions of social media? What educational strategies can facilitate their learning of social media? A thematic map was developed to illustrate changing perceptions from the initial unanimous, strong negative to the more positive but cautious, and to…
Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Comparative Analysis, Student Attitudes, Positive Attitudes
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Cresci, M. Kay; Yarandi, Hossein N.; Morrell, Roger W. – Educational Gerontology, 2010
Enthusiasm for information technology (IT) is growing among older adults. Many older adults enjoy IT and the Internet (Pro-Nets), but others have no desire to use it (No-Nets). This study found that Pro-Nets and No-Nets were different on a number of variables that might predict IT use. No-Nets were older, had less education and income, were…
Descriptors: Older Adults, Information Technology, Internet, Prediction