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Showing 1 to 15 of 108 results Save | Export
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Borelli, Jessica L.; Hong, Kajung; Rasmussen, Hannah F.; Smiley, Patricia A. – Developmental Psychology, 2017
Theorists argue that parental reflective functioning (PRF) is activated in response to emotions, potentially supporting parenting sensitivity even when arousal is high. That is, when parents become emotionally reactive when interacting with their children, those who can use PRF to understand their children's mental states should be able to parent…
Descriptors: Emotional Response, Arousal Patterns, Parents, Parent Child Relationship
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Hepach, Robert; Vaish, Amrisha; Grossmann, Tobias; Tomasello, Michael – Child Development, 2016
Children's instrumental helping has sometimes been interpreted as a desire to complete action sequences or to restore the physical order of things. Two-year-old children (n = 51) selectively retrieved for an adult the object he needed rather than one he did not (but which equally served to restore the previous order of things), and those with…
Descriptors: Helping Relationship, Toddlers, Young Children, Arousal Patterns
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Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2015
The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…
Descriptors: Experimental Psychology, Arousal Patterns, Inhibition, Cues
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Tseng, Angela; Bansal, Ravi; Liu, Jun; Gerber, Andrew J.; Goh, Suzanne; Posner, Jonathan; Colibazzi, Tiziano; Algermissen, Molly; Chiang, I-Chin; Russell, James A.; Peterson, Bradley S. – Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2014
The Affective Circumplex Model holds that emotions can be described as linear combinations of two underlying, independent neurophysiological systems (arousal, valence). Given research suggesting individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty processing emotions, we used the circumplex model to compare how individuals with ASD and…
Descriptors: Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Emotional Response, Nonverbal Communication
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Vos, P.; De Cock, P.; Petry, K.; Van Den Noortgate, W.; Maes, B. – Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 2013
Background: Behavioural observations are the most frequently used source of information about emotions of people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities but have not yet been validated against other measures of emotion. In this study we wanted to validate the behavioural observations of emotions using respiration (rib cage contribution,…
Descriptors: Emotional Response, Severe Mental Retardation, Metabolism, Behavior
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Tonnsen, Bridgette L.; Shinkareva, Svetlana V.; Deal, Sara C.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Roberts, Jane E. – American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2013
Anxiety is among the most impairing conditions associated with Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and is putatively linked to atypical physiological arousal. However, few studies have examined this association in young children with FXS. The authors examined whether patterns of arousal and behavior during an experimental stranger approach paradigm differ…
Descriptors: Anxiety, Genetic Disorders, Physiology, Arousal Patterns
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Stevenson, Hugh; Russell, Paul N.; Helton, William S. – Brain and Cognition, 2011
In the present experiment, we used search asymmetry to test whether the sustained attention to response task is a better measure of response inhibition or sustained attention. Participants performed feature present and feature absent target detection tasks using either a sustained attention to response task (SART; high Go low No-Go) or a…
Descriptors: Responses, Inhibition, Attention, Arousal Patterns
Reyes, Jorge R.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hall, Astrid – Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 2011
Three adult male sex offenders with developmental disabilities participated in phallometric assessments that involved repeated measures of arousal when exposed to various stimuli. Arousal assessment outcomes were similar to those obtained by Reyes et al. (2006). Additional data-analysis methods provided further information about sexual…
Descriptors: Developmental Disabilities, Arousal Patterns, Crime, Males
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Szalma, James L.; Hancock, Peter A. – Psychological Bulletin, 2011
Noise is a pervasive and influential source of stress. Whether through the acute effects of impulse noise or the chronic influence of prolonged exposure, the challenge of noise confronts many who must accomplish vital performance duties in its presence. Although noise has diffuse effects, which are shared in common with many other chronic forms of…
Descriptors: Acoustics, Context Effect, Responses, Auditory Perception
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Zhang, Jianliang; Kalinowski, Joseph; Saltuklaroglu, Tim; Hudock, Daniel – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2010
Background: Previous studies have found simultaneous increases in skin conductance response and decreases in heart rate when normally fluent speakers watched and listened to stuttered speech compared with fluent speech, suggesting that stuttering induces arousal and emotional unpleasantness in listeners. However, physiological responses of persons…
Descriptors: Metabolism, Stuttering, Coping, Speech Skills
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Geurts, Hilde M.; Begeer, Sander; Stockmann, Lex – Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2009
The current study explored whether inhibitory control deficits in high functioning autism (HFA) emerged when socially relevant stimuli were used and whether arousal level affected the performance. A Go/NoGo paradigm, with socially relevant stimuli and varying presentation rates, was applied in 18 children with HFA (including children with autism…
Descriptors: Responses, Stimuli, Arousal Patterns, Autism
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Bolte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Poustka, Fritz – Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2008
This study examined physiological response and affective report in 10 adult individuals with autism and 10 typically developing controls. An emotion induction paradigm using stimuli from the International Affective Picture System was applied. Blood pressure, heart and self-ratings of experienced valence (pleasure), arousal and dominance (control)…
Descriptors: Visual Stimuli, Autism, Emotional Response, Cognitive Processes
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Kylliainen, Anneli; Hietanen, Jari K. – Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2006
The effects of another person's gaze on physiological arousal were investigated by measuring skin conductance responses (SCR). Twelve able children with autism and 12 control children were shown face stimuli with straight gaze (eye contact) or averted gaze on a computer monitor. In children with autism, the responses to straight gaze were stronger…
Descriptors: Responses, Children, Autism, Control Groups
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Feindler, Eva L.; Starr, Karen E. – Reclaiming Children and Youth: The Journal of Strength-based Interventions, 2003
Teaching children and adolescents to recognize how they feel when they are angry and what pushes their buttons enables them to make better choices about how they express their anger. They learn that staying cool gives them the power to create more positive outcomes for potentially negative encounters. Through self-assessment and role-plays, they…
Descriptors: Psychological Patterns, Adolescents, Children, Conflict
Lefcourt, Herbert M. – Canadian Psychological Review, 1976
The results obtained in a series of investigations with locus of control used as an independent variable provide evidence in support of the results obtained from situationally contrived studies of perceived control. The impact of stressors seems to be diminished in situations in which participants can exercise some degree of control. Likewise,…
Descriptors: Arousal Patterns, Behavior, Emotional Response, Individual Characteristics
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