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Busuito, Alex; Quigley, Kelsey M.; Moore, Ginger A.; Voegtline, Kristin M.; DiPietro, Janet A. – Developmental Psychology, 2019
Infant-mother behavioral synchrony is thought to scaffold the development of self-regulation in the first years of life. During this time, infants' and mothers' physiological regulation may contribute to dyadic synchrony and, in infants, dyadic synchrony may support infants' physiological regulation. Because the sympathetic nervous system (SNS)…
Descriptors: Correlation, Infants, Mothers, Parent Child Relationship
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Wass, Sam V.; de Barbaro, Kaya; Clackson, Kaili; Leong, Victoria – Developmental Psychology, 2018
Previous research is inconsistent as to whether a more labile (faster-changing) autonomic system confers performance advantages, or disadvantages, in infants and children. To examine this, we presented a stimulus battery consisting of mixed static and dynamic viewing materials to a cohort of 63 typical 12-month-old infants. While viewing the…
Descriptors: Infants, Attention, Anxiety, Attention Span
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Cohrdes, Caroline; Wrzus, Cornelia; Frisch, Simon; Riediger, Michaela – Developmental Psychology, 2017
In previous studies, older as compared with younger individuals were more strongly motivated to regulate their momentary affect toward pleasant and calm states. Whether these motivational differences are also reflected in regulatory behavior and whether this behavior is efficient in terms of affect change, however, is unclear. To address these…
Descriptors: Music, Listening, Age Differences, Adolescents
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Borelli, Jessica L.; Hong, Kajung; Rasmussen, Hannah F.; Smiley, Patricia A. – Developmental Psychology, 2017
Theorists argue that parental reflective functioning (PRF) is activated in response to emotions, potentially supporting parenting sensitivity even when arousal is high. That is, when parents become emotionally reactive when interacting with their children, those who can use PRF to understand their children's mental states should be able to parent…
Descriptors: Emotional Response, Arousal Patterns, Parents, Parent Child Relationship
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Miller, Jonas G.; Kahle, Sarah; Lopez, Monica; Hastings, Paul D. – Developmental Psychology, 2015
The links among mothers' compassionate love for their child, autonomic nervous system activity, and parenting behavior during less and more challenging mother-child interactions were examined. Mothers expressed and reported less negative affect when they exhibited autonomic patterns of increased parasympathetic dominance (high parasympathetic…
Descriptors: Mothers, Affective Behavior, Parent Child Relationship, Neurology
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Nikkelen, Sanne W. C.; Valkenburg, Patti M.; Huizinga, Mariette; Bushman, Brad J. – Developmental Psychology, 2014
There are several theoretical reasons to believe that media use might be related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD-related behaviors (i.e., attention problems, hyperactivity, and impulsivity). Although studies into the media--ADHD relationship have accumulated, they have yielded inconsistent results. Therefore, we still do…
Descriptors: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Mass Media Effects, Correlation, Children
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Nikitin, Jana; Schoch, Simone; Freund, Alexandra M. – Developmental Psychology, 2014
A study with n = 55 younger (18-33 years, M = 23.67) and n = 58 older (61-85 years, M = 71.44) adults investigated age-related differences in social approach and avoidance motivation and their consequences for the experience of social interactions. Results confirmed the hypothesis that a predominant habitual approach motivation in younger adults…
Descriptors: Adult Development, Motivation, Peer Acceptance, Social Isolation
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Blair, Clancy; Ursache, Alexandra; Mills-Koonce, Roger; Stifter, Cynthia; Voegtline, Kristin; Granger, Douglas A. – Developmental Psychology, 2015
Cortisol output in response to emotion induction procedures was examined at child age 24 months in a prospective longitudinal sample of 1,292 children and families in predominantly low-income and nonurban communities in two regions of high poverty in the United States. Multilevel analysis indicated that observed emotional reactivity to a mask…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Stress Variables, Physiology, Emotional Response
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Nagy, Emese; Pilling, Karen; Orvos, Hajnalka; Molnar, Peter – Developmental Psychology, 2013
Although a large body of evidence has accumulated on the young human infant's ability to imitate, the phenomenon has failed to gain unanimous acceptance. Imitation of tongue protrusion, the most tested gesture to date, was examined in a sample of 115 newborns in the first 5 days of life in 3 seating positions. An ethologically based…
Descriptors: Infant Behavior, Neonates, Imitation, Human Body
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Ashton, Roderick – Developmental Psychology, 1976
Descriptors: Arousal Patterns, Infant Behavior, Infants, Responses
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Macdonald, Nancy E.; Silverman, Irwin W. – Developmental Psychology, 1978
Descriptors: Arousal Patterns, Emotional Response, Infant Behavior, Infants
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Bendersky, Margaret; Lewis, Michael – Developmental Psychology, 1998
Examined arousal regulation as a function of levels of prenatal cocaine exposure in 4-month-olds, using a "still face" procedure. Found that, independent of several other factors, a greater percentage of heavily cocaine-exposed infants, compared to unexposed infants, showed less enjoyment during "en face" play with their mothers and continued to…
Descriptors: Affective Behavior, Arousal Patterns, Attention, Cocaine
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Eckerman, Carol O.; Hsu, Hui-Chin; Molitor, Adriana; Leung, Eleanor H. L.; Goldstein, Ricki F. – Developmental Psychology, 1999
Compared arousal during peekaboo game of low birthweight infants with higher or lower perinatal risk to that of healthy full-term infants. Found that low birthweight babies showed less positive arousal, more negative arousal, and three mixtures of behavioral cues than full-term babies, who showed strong positive and negative responses. Perinatal…
Descriptors: Arousal Patterns, At Risk Persons, Behavior Development, Birth Weight
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Geva, Ronny; Gardner, Judith M.; Karmel, Bernard Z. – Developmental Psychology, 1999
Studied feeding-related arousal effects on a visual recognition paired-comparison task at newborn, 1, and 4 months of age. Found that newborns and 1-month olds shifted from a familiarity preference before feeding to a novelty preference after feeding. Control-group testing confirmed that shift was not due to increased stimulus exposure. By 4…
Descriptors: Age Differences, Arousal Patterns, Comparative Analysis, Dimensional Preference
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Blass, Elliott M.; Smith, Barbara A. – Developmental Psychology, 1992
The potency of different sugars as calming agents in human infants was investigated in 2 experiments with 40 infants. Sucrose and fructose were equally effective calming agents, whereas glucose was less effective. Results indicate that the calming effects of milk lie in components other than its sugar. (LB)
Descriptors: Arousal Patterns, Comparative Analysis, Crying, Experimental Psychology
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